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Directory of States with Approved
Occupational Safety and Health Plans

Alaska Hawaii  Maryland  New Jersey Oregon  Utah  Washington 
Arizona Indiana  Michigan  New Mexico Puerto Rico Vermont  Wyoming
California Iowa Minnesota  New York South Carolina Virgin Islands     Reg. Offices
Connecticut  Kentucky  Nevada  North Carolina Tennessee  Virginia Area Offices 

 Select State Above - CT, NJ, NY, VI Are Public OSH Programs Only

Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development Alaska Flag
1111 W. 8th Street, Room 304
Juneau, Alaska 99801-1149

Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 111149

Juneau, Alaska 99811-1149

Dianne Blumer, Commissioner
 (907) 465-2700
 (907) 465-2784


Labor Standards & Safety

Grey Mitchell, Director
 (907) 465-4855
 (907) 465-6012

Juneau TDD
 (907) 465-5952
(ask for message to be relayed to LS & S)

Anchorage TDD
 (800) 770-8973
(RELAY Alaska)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Enforcement

3301 Eagle Street, Suite 305
Anchorage, Alaska 99503

Anchorage Enforcement
 (907) 269-4940 | (800) 770-4940
 (907) 269-4950

Consultation and Training

3301 Eagle Street, Rm. 305
Anchorage, Alaska 99503

 (907) 269-4955 | (800) 656-4972
 (907) 269-4950
Consultation and Training

About the Alaska State Plan [Alaska State Plan Website]

The state of Alaska, under an agreement with OSHA, operates an occupational safety and health program in accordance with Section 18 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The Alaska state plan was initially approved August 10, 1973, and was granted final state plan approval on September 28, 1984.

The Alaska Occupational Safety and Health Program (AKOSH) is a part of the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development, Labor Standards and Safety Division. The head of the Department is the Commissioner of Labor. There are two main offices located in Anchorage and Juneau, and smaller offices in Fairbanks and Ketchikan.

Jurisdiction

The state of Alaska exercises safety and health jurisdiction over most private sector employers in the state, and over public sector employers other than the federal government.

Federal OSHA exercises jurisdiction over those employers not covered by the state of Alaska, to include: maritime employers such as shipyards, floating seafood processors, and longshoring; offshore oil platforms and production facilities; certain Indian Health Service hospitals and clinics; the United States Postal Service; civilian employees of the federal government; and all private and federal sector employment within the National Parks and a series of missile defense bases. See 29 CFR 1952.244.

Regulations and Standards

In 1995, Alaska (AKOSH) began adopting most federal OSHA standards by reference. A limited number of state-specific standards remain in effect at this time, including Petroleum Refining and Petroleum Drilling & Production. Alaska also has a logging code that is significantly different from federal OSHA's logging standard.

Alaska has adopted the federal recordkeeping and reporting requirements, except that the state requires notification when one or more employees require hospitalization. The state's reporting requirements also provide for employers operating on a seasonal basis.

Links to Alaska's Occupational Safety and Health Standards and recordkeeping requirements are available on the Division of Labor Standards and Safety home page.

Since Alaska has opted to have no jurisdiction in maritime industries, it has not adopted 29 CFR 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918 or 1919, or a state equivalent.

Enforcement Programs

AKOSH has adopted the federal Field Inspection Reference Manual (FIRM) to provide policy guidance for its enforcement program.

Information on unique enforcement initiatives or local emphasis programs can be obtained by calling (800) 770-4949 or (907) 269-4955.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

AKOSH offers a number of voluntary and cooperative programs focused on reducing injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. Alaska employers are invited to take advantage of the on-site consultation program, SHARP, and VPP, Alliances, and partnerships. More information on these programs is available at these links:

SafetyTraining

Equipment

Consultants

Policies and Procedures

UpIconAn explanation of Alaska's Program Directives can be found on their website.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

The Alaska Occupational Safety and Health Review Board hears and decides appeals of citations, including penalties and abatement dates, issued by the enforcement unit of AKOSH

 

Arizona FlagIndustrial Commission of Arizona

  • 800 W. Washington Street
  • Phoenix, AZ 85007

      Laura L. McGrory, Director & State Designee


Arizona Division of Occupational Safety and Health (ADOSH)

Phoenix Office

  • 800 W. Washington Street, 2nd floor
  • Phoenix, AZ 85007
  •  (602) 542-5795
  •  (602) 542-1614

      Bill Warren, Director

      Larry Gast, Assistant Director

      Jessie Atencio, Consultation & Training Manager

      (520) 628-5478

Tucson Office

  • 2675 E. Broadway Blvd. #239
  • Tucson, AZ 85716
  •  (520) 628-5478
  •  (520) 322-8008

      Jessie Atencio, Assistant Director


About the Arizona State Plan [Arizona State Plan Website]

The State of Arizona, under an agreement with OSHA, operates an occupational safety and health program in accordance with Section 18 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. Initial approval of the Arizona State Plan was published on November 5, 1974 and, and final approval was published on June 20, 1985.

The Arizona State Plan is administered by the Industrial Commission of Arizona (ICA) and within the ICA, the Arizona Division of Occupational Safety and Health (ADOSH) is responsible for enforcement and voluntary compliance.

ADOSH is headquartered in Phoenix and has offices in Phoenix and Tucson.

Jurisdiction

The Arizona State Plan applies to all public and private sector places of employment in the State, with the exception of Federal employees, the United States Postal Service (USPS), private sector maritime, employment on Indian Lands, areas of exclusive Federal jurisdiction; copper smelters, and concrete and asphalt batch plants that are physically located within mine property, which are subject to Federal jurisdiction. See 29 CFR 1952.355.

Regulations and Standards

Arizona adopts federal OSHA standards by reference and enforces OSHA standards contained within 29 CFR, parts 1910 (General Industry), 1926 (Construction) and 1928 (Agriculture). In addition, there are a few requirements that are unique to Arizona, including prohibition on the use of the short-handled hoe in agriculture work and the use of PVC pipe to transport compressed gasses, including air. Information on Arizona's standards and regulations are available at the Arizona Secretary of State Website.

Enforcement Programs

ADOSH's compliance activities consist of conducting unannounced inspections of workplaces throughout Arizona to determine whether employers are complying with the Occupational Safety and Health Act and standards. Inspections may be the result of a work-related accident, a complaint, a referral, a planned inspection or a follow-up to ensure that previously cited serious, repeat or willful violations have been corrected.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

ADOSH offers voluntary and cooperative programs such as the Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP) and the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP). Information on Arizona's programs are available at the ADOSH Website.

The Arizona Consultation and Training Section provides assistance to private and public employers through on-site safety and health consultative surveys, telephone support, publications and educational outreach. The consultative surveys include the identification of hazardous working conditions, program evaluations, industrial hygiene monitoring, and informal training. ADOSH Consultation offers a wide variety of compliance assistance materials such as the ADOSH poster, ADOSH newsletter, Video Lending Library, Publications and Brochures. In addition, they offer extensive training throughout the state to employers and employees on a variety of safety and health topics. Check the ADOSH Consultation and Training Page for the latest training schedule or call the phone number listed in the contact section.

Policies and Procedures

ADOSH follows a Field Inspection Reference Manual (FIRM) similar to the federal FIRM which provides policy guidance for its enforcement program. Penalties proposed by ADOSH are reviewed by the Commissioners of the Industrial Commission before they are issued. The Commission is made up of five Commissioners appointed by the Governor.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

Pursuant to Arizona Administrative Code (A.A.C.) R20-5-626, the employer, any affected employee or the employee representative many request an informal conference.

Disputes of citations issued by ADOSH are heard by the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) Division and a written decision is issued at the conclusion of the hearing process. Their decisions are appealable to the ADOSH Review Board and from there to the Arizona Court of Appeals. Full-time administrative law judges (ALJ) are e

Safety   Training

Equipment

Consultants

mployed in Phoenix and Tucson.

Contact the ALJ office for hearing information:UpIcon
Phoenix
800 W. Washington Street
Phoenix, AZ 85007
(602) 542-5241
Tucson
2675 E. Broadway
Tucson, AZ 85716
(520) 628-5188
 

California FlagCalifornia Department of Industrial Relations

  • 1515 Clay Street, 17th Floor
  • Oakland, California 94612
  • (510) 622-3965

      Christine Baker, Director


Division of Occupational Safety and Health
  • 1515 Clay Street Suite 1901
  • Oakland, CA 94612
  • (510) 286-7000
  • (510) 286-7037
  • DOSH

      Juliann Sum, Acting Chief

      Cora Gherga, Acting Deputy Chief, Enforcement

      Deborah Gold, Deputy Chief, Health and Engineering Services

Cal/OSHA Consultation Services
  • 2000 E. McFadden Avenue, Suite 214
  • Santa Ana, CA 92705
  • (714) 558-4411 | (800) 963-9424

      Vicky Heza, Program Manager 

Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board
  • 2520 Venture Oaks Way, Suite 350
  • Sacramento, CA 95833
  • (916) 274-5721
  • (916) 274-5743
  • OSHSB

      Marley Hart, Executive Officer 

Occupational Safety and Health Appeals Board
  • 2520 Venture Oaks Way, Suite 300
  • Sacramento, CA 95833
  • (916) 274-5751
  • (916) 274-5785
  • Appeals Board

      Kari Johnson, Acting Executive Officer 

Division of Labor Standards Enforcement
  • Discrimination Complaint Investigation Unit
  • 455 Golden Gate Avenue, 9th Floor
  • San Francisco, CA 94102
  • (415) 703-4820
  • (415) 703-4807


About the California State Plan [California State Plan Website]

The State of California, under an agreement with OSHA, operates an occupational safety and health program in accordance with Section 18 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. Initial approval of the California State Plan was published on May 1, 1973, and certification for completing all developmental steps was received on August 19, 1977.

The Department of Industrial Relations administers the California Occupational Safety and Health Program, commonly referred to as Cal/OSHA. The Division of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH) is the principal executor of the plan which oversees enforcement and consultation.

In addition, the program has an independent Standards Board responsible for the promulgation of state safety and health standards and the review of variances; an Appeals Board to adjudicate contested citations; and the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement to investigate complaints alleging discriminatory retaliation in the workplace.

Jurisdiction

The California State Plan applies to all public and private sector places of employment in the state, with the exception of Federal employees, the United States Postal Service (USPS), private sector employers on Native American lands, maritime activities on the navigable waterways of the United States, private contractors working on land designated as exclusive Federal jurisdiction, and employers that require Federal security clearances. See 29 CFR 1952.172.

Regulations and Standards

The Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board is a standard setting agency within the Cal/OSHA program. The Board's objectives are to adopt reasonable and enforceable standards at least as effective as federal standards within six months of the effective date, grant or deny applications for variances from adopted standards, and respond to petitions for new or revised standards.

This is the only agency in the state authorized to adopt, amend or repeal occupational safety and health standards or orders. In addition, the Standards Board maintains standards for certain areas not covered by federal standards or enforcement. These latter standards apply to elevators, aerial passenger tramways, amusement rides, pressure vessels, and mine safety training.

When the need for rulemaking action has been established, staff develops the proposed standard changes generally with the assistance and recommendation of an advisory committee that consists of representatives from industry, labor, the public, and other interested groups. The proposal is then scheduled for the Board at a public hearing that is held monthly in Sacramento, Los Angeles, Oakland, or San Diego.

The independent Board is a part-time seven-member body appointed by the Governor with representation from labor, management, occupational safety, occupational health, and the general public.

Enforcement Programs

The Cal/OSHA enforcement unit has jurisdiction over every place of employment in California which is necessary to adequately enforce and administer all occupational safety and health standards and regulations.

The Cal/OSHA enforcement unit conducts inspections of California workplaces in response to a report of an industrial accident, a complaint about an occupational safety and health hazard, or as part of an inspection program targeting industries which have a high rate of occupational hazards, fatalities, injuries or illnesses.

The Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (DLSE) investigates allegations of retaliation or discrimination for complaining about safety and health conditions or practices in the workplace within six months of adverse action. Additional information is available on the DLSE web page.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

California has developed several programs that rely on industry, labor, and government to work as partners in encouraging and recognizing workplace safety and health programs that effectively prevent and control injuries and illnesses to workers. These partnership programs are promoted and emphasized to encourage employers to participate. Additional information on Voluntary Protection Program (VPP), Golden State, Golden Gate, and Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP) is available on the California Partnership Page.

Cal/OSHA Consultation provides workplace safety and health assistance to employers and workers through on-site assistance and special emphasis programs. Consultative assistance is provided to employers through on-site visits, telephone support, publications and educational outreach.

Policies and Procedures

Cal/OSHA's policies and procedures for enforcement.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

An employer who has been issued a citation or notice, or another affected person, may participate in an informal conference with Division personnel and discuss any evidence which affects the existence or classification of the alleged violation and/or the proposed penalty. Employers should contact the Area Office that issued the citation to request an informal conference.

The Occupational Safety and Health Appeals Board handles appeals from private and public sector employers and employees regarding citations issued by Cal/OSHA for alleged violations of workplace safety and health laws and regulations

The Board consists of three members appointed by the governor for staggered four-year terms. By statute, one member is selected from the field of management, one from the field of labor, and one from the general public.

 

Safety   Training

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Consultants

Employers may appeal a citation and notification of penalty, notification of failure to abate, special order, or order to take special action within 15 UpIconworking days from receipt of one of these documents. When the Board receives notification, it is reviewed for timeliness and assigned a docket number. Thereafter, dates will then be set for a telephonic pre-hearing conference and an appeal hearing. Additional information is available on the Appeals Board page.
Occupational Safety and Health Appeals Board
2520 Venture Oaks Way, Suite 300
Sacramento, CA 95833
(916) 274-5751
(916) 274-5785
Appeals Board
 

NOTE: CONN-OSHA does not enforce occupational safety and health standards in private businesses in Connecticut. In those businesses, OSHA standards are enforced by Federal OSHA. The two  Federal Area Offices   in Connecticut are located in Bridgeport and Hartford.
Connecticut Flag
Connecticut Department of Labor

  • 200 Folly Brook Boulevard
  • Wethersfield, Connecticut 06109

      Sharon Palmer, Commissioner

  • (860) 263-6505
  • (860) 263-6529

  • Division of Occupational Safety and Health
  • 38 Wolcott Hill Road
  • Wethersfield, Connecticut 06109

      Kenneth Tucker, Director

  • (860) 263-6900
  • (860) 263-6940


About the Connecticut State Plan [Connecticut State Plan Website]


The State of Connecticut, under an agreement with OSHA, operates an occupational safety and health program in accordance with Section 18(b) of the Occupational Safety and health Act of 1970. The Connecticut State Plan was initially approved October 2, 1978, and was certified on August 19, 1986.

The Connecticut Occupational Safety and Health Division (CONN-OSHA) is part of the Connecticut Department of Labor. Connecticut OSHA is currently headed by Mr. Kenneth Tucker, Director. Connecticut OSHA is located in Wethersfield, Connecticut.

Jurisdiction

The Connecticut State Plan applies to all public sector employers other than the Federal government employees. Federal government employees are covered by Federal OSHA, which also exercises jurisdiction over most private sector employers in the State of Connecticut. See 29 CFR 1956.40(a).

Regulations and Standards

CONN-OSHA has adopted all Federal OSHA standards that would relate to public sector employer operations. CONN-OSHA incorporates Federal standards by reference. Therefore, the State and Federal standards are identical. They relate to existing parts as follows:

Federal Standard Number Connecticut Standard Number
1910 31-372-101-1910
1915 31-372-102-1915
1916 31-372-103-1916
1917 31-372-104-1917
1918 31-372-105-1918
1919 31-372-106-1919
1926 31-372-107-1926
1928 31-372-108-1928
Enforcement Programs

Connecticut OSHA enforcement information is available at (860) 263-6900 or on the Connecticut Department of Labor website.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

CONN-OSHA offers a number of voluntary and cooperative programs focused on reducing injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. Connecticut employers - both public and private - are invited to take advantage of the on-site consultation program, SHARP, Alliances, and Partnerships. More information on these programs is available at these links:

Policies and Procedures

Connecticut OSHA Program Directives are available at the Connecticut Department of Labor website.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

The Connecticut Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission hears and decides appeals of citations, including penalties and abatement dates, issued by the enforcement unit of CONN-OSHA. For more information contact (860) 263-6910.

Information about informal conferences can be accessed Connecticut Department of

Labor website.
Other Resources

Connecticut OSHA offers a wide variety of compliance assistance materials and

Safety   Training

Equipment

Consultants

services via its public internet site.

UpIconExamples include:

  • CONN-OSHA Quarterly publication
  • Informatión en español
  • Application for Health Facility Licenses
  • Training and calendar of events
  • Requesting on-site consultation.

 

 Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial RelationsHawaii Flag

  • 830 Punchbowl Street, Suite 321
  • Honolulu, HI 96813
  •  (808) 586-8844

      Dwight Takamine,

      Director of Department of   Labor & Industrial 

      Relations


HIOSH (Enforcement & Consultation)
  • 830 Punchbowl Street, Suite 423
  • Honolulu, HI 96813

      Diantha Goo, HIOSH Administrator

     (808) 586-9116 

  • Consultation
  •  (808) 586-9100
  • Accident Reporting Line
  •  (808) 586-9102
  • Complaints -
  • HIOSH
  •  (808) 586-9092
  •  (808) 586-9104
  •  HIOSH
  • Federal OSHA
  • How to File a Complaint 
  • Field Office locations and telephone numbers are available on the HIOSH contacts page.


About the Hawaii State Plan [Hawaii State Plan Website]

The State of Hawaii, under an agreement with OSHA, operates an occupational safety and health program in accordance with Section 18 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. Hawaii's Occupational Safety and Health Plan was approved on January 4, 1974, and was certified on May 9, 1978 as having completed all specified developmental steps. On April 30, 1984 the State was granted final approval and concurrent Federal enforcement authority was relinquished under Section 18(e) of the Act. However, on September 21, 2012, the Hawaii State Plan's approval status was modified from final approval to initial approval in order to allow for concurrent Federal jurisdiction and supplementary Federal enforcement activity (77 FR 58488). This action was in response to Hawaii's request for Federal enforcement assistance during a period of program strengthening and rebuilding.

The designated agency for the administration of the Hawaii State Plan is the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR). Within the DLIR, the Hawaii Occupational Safety and Health Division (HIOSH) is responsible for both enforcement and consultation programs. HIOSH is headquartered in the State capital of Honolulu.

Jurisdiction

The Hawaii State Plan applies to all private and public sector places of employment in the State, with the exception of Federal employees, the United States Postal Service (USPS), private sector maritime, and land that is under exclusive Federal jurisdiction, all of which are subject to Federal OSHA jurisdiction. See 29 CFR 1952.314.

Following the September 21, 2012 modification of the Hawaii State Plan's approval status, Federal OSHA assumed concurrent jurisdiction of private sector employment in the State and began providing enforcement activity in accordance with the terms of an Operational Status Agreement (OSA) (DOC*) between Federal OSHA and Hawaii, signed on September 21, 2012. After the first year of the planned three-year developmental period, Hawaii's Department of Labor and Industrial Relations has taken the initial steps in rebuilding the capacity of HIOSH. As such, OSHA and HIOSH agreed to amend the OSA to return greater responsibility to HIOSH for Fiscal Year 2014. Accordingly, an Addendum to the OSA (PDF*) was signed into effect on November 27, 2013.

Additional FAQs about the modification of the Hawaii State Plan's final approval status and the OSA can be found on HIOSH's website.

Regulations and Standards

Hawaii has chosen to adopt the majority of Federal OSHA standards verbatim. However, there are some standards that, while deemed as effective as comparable federal standards, have significant differences, and there are some HIOSH standards which do not have any federal counterparts. Examples of HIOSH standards which differ from Federal OSHA standards are those for fall protection, steel erection and air contaminants. HIOSH has requirements for safety and health programs and for certification of hoisting equipment operators which have no Federal OSHA counterpart. HIOSH's standards can be found online at the Hawaii Standards Website.

HIOSH's standards are numbered in accordance with other state regulations and can be found under Title 12, Subtitle 8.

During the period of concurrent Federal jurisdiction, Federal OSHA compliance officers will be conducting inspections, in accordance with the terms of the OSA, and issuing citations and penalties pursuant to Federal standards and policies. When Hawaii conducts an inspection, HIOSH compliance officers will issue citations and penalties under Hawaii's standards and policies. Resumption of concurrent Federal jurisdiction does not impose any new compliance obligations on affected employers since standards enforced under the Hawaii State Plan are either identical to Federal standards, or more stringent.

Enforcement Programs

Information on enforcement activities including unique enforcement initiatives and local emphasis programs can be obtained online at HIOSH's website or by calling the numbers listed in the Contact Information section of this webpage.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

HIOSH operates the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) and Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP). HIOSH also offers safety and health assistance to Hawaii's employers through a voluntary on-site consultation program. Employers interested in applying for these programs should call the phone number listed for Consultation in the Contact Information section above.

Policies and Procedures

HIOSH's program directives can be found under Guidelines on the HIOSH website.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

Informal conferences may be requested at any time during the 20 calendar day period after an employer receives a citation. HIOSH's policies regarding informal conferences can be found in their FOM (PDF). Federal OSHA's policies regarding informal conferences can be found in Chapter 7 of the Federal FOM (PDF).

The Hawaii Labor Relations Board hears and decides appeals of citations, including penalties and abatement dates, issued by the enforcement unit of HIOSH.

Princess Keelikolani Bldg.
830 Punchbowl Street #434
Honolulu, HI 96813
Carson City, NV 89701-4052
(808) 586-8610
(808) 586-8613
The Hawaii Labor Relations Board

For basic information about Federal OSHA enforcement, including the appeals

Safety   Training

Equipment

Consultants

process, please see the OSHA Inspections Fact Sheet (PDF*).
UpIconOther Resources
HIOSH offers a wide variety of compliance assistance materials  and services via its public internet site. There is an online audio/visual library of occupational safety and health material available to the public as well as other publications.
830 Punchbowl Street  
Honolulu, Hawaii 96813
(808) 586-9100
(808) 586-9104 FAX

 Indiana Department of LaborIndiana Flag

  • 402 West Washington Street
  • Room W-195
  • Indianapolis, IN 46204

     
Rick J. Ruble,   Commissioner of Labor


Indiana OSHA (IOSHA)
  • Tim Maley, Deputy Commissioner of Labor for Indiana OSHA
  • (317) 233-3605
  • Tim Maley 
  • Michelle Ellison, Deputy Commissioner for INSafe (Consultative Programs) 
  • Michelle Ellison 

    About the Indiana State Plan [Indiana State Plan Website]

    The Indiana Occupational Safety and Health Administration (IOSHA) is dedicated to ensuring Hoosier workplace safety and health. To be successful, IOSHA will improve workplace safety and health for all Indiana workers by reducing hazards and exposures in the workplace environment that result in occupational injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. IOSHA works to change workplace culture to increase employer and worker awareness of, commitment to, and involvement in workplace safety and health while securing public confidence through excellence in the development and delivery of our programs and services.

    The Indiana Occupational Safety and Health program is administered by the Indiana Department of Labor. IOSHA is responsible for enforcement of workplace safety and health regulations for most private and public employers. The Department of Labor is also home to INSafe which conducts consultative programs for Indiana businesses and public entities upon request. The Indiana Plan was granted final state plan approval on September 26, 1986.

    Management of the IOSHA program is the responsibility of the Deputy Commissioner for IOSHA. The Deputy Commissioner of IOSHA is assisted by two Directors (Industry and Construction) and multiple Supervisors that handle the day to day workload.

    Jurisdiction

    IOSHA applies to all places of employment in the State, with the exception of Federal Government employees, the United States Postal Service (USPS), private sector maritime, and certain agricultural related operations (the field sanitation standard and temporary labor camps), which are subject to Federal OSHA jurisdiction. See 29 CFR 1952.324.

    Regulations and Standards

    Indiana OSHA adopts Federal OSHA regulations and standards identically.

    Enforcement Programs

    The General Industry division conducts safety and health inspections in all places of employment within the State of Indiana with the exception of those covered by the Construction Safety Division. Indiana OSHA conducts inspections in accordance with established priorities including reports of imminent dangers, fatalities and catastrophes, and complaints from employees or their representatives, and referrals from other agencies. In addition, Indiana OSHA conducts unannounced inspections of private and public sector general industry and construction employers in accordance with current enforcement program priorities. The Indiana OSHA program currently has emphasis programs dealing with Petroleum Refining, Combustible Dust, Diacetyl/Microwave Popcorn, and Fall Protection in construction.

    Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

    The Indiana Department of Labor also administers the INSafe program. This program is consultative in nature and can be initiated only by employer request. By law, business specific information cannot be shared between INSafe and IOSHA. The department has consultants trained in a variety of disciplines. Some Consultants are bilingual. The INSafe works with Indiana's employers, employees, labor unions, professional groups, trade organizations, and others to ensure workplace health and safety. Free INSafe services include group training and seminars, on-site consultations, educational publications and training materials, along with pro-active voluntary health and safety programs designed to bring employers and employees together to create and maintain healthy working environments. The Indiana Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (INSHARP) recognizes smaller employers working towards exemplary safety and health management systems. Companies with fewer than 250 employees on-site, and no more than 500 employees nationwide, are eligible to participate.

    The Governor's Workplace Safety Awards recognize the most innovative safety and health initiatives among Indiana's workplaces. Indiana businesses, industrial facilities, individuals, institutions, municipalities, schools, service organizations, trade unions and nonprofit organizations are eligible for this annual recognition.

    Indiana's Voluntary Protection Programs, modeled closely after its Federal counterpart, welcomed its first VPP site in 1997. With more than 45 participants at both the Merit and Star levels, Indiana ranks in the top five of state plan states in number of participating sites. Indiana's VPP sites range in size from fewer than 20 employees to more than 8,000. We have participants in industries that span from pharmaceuticals to snack foods and from scrap recycling to the production and processing of seed corn. Indiana eagerly welcomes additional qualified participants.

    Policies and Procedures

    Indiana OSHA policies and procedures are available in hard copy upon request. IOSHA Information: (317) 232-2655.

    Informal Conferences and Appeals

    Informal conferences are held with IOSHA Supervisors or Directors in an effort to resolve cases informally. The protocol for timing and handling is identical to the Federal programs.

    In those cases that are not resolved through the informal conference process, appeals are heard by the Indiana Board of Safety Review. The enabling

    Safety   Training

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    Consultants

    legislation for the Board is found at Indiana Code 615 IUpIcon.A.C. et seq. This is an independent Administrative Review Board domiciled within the Department of Labor. The Board's case work is governed by the Indiana Administrative Orders and Procedures Act (AOPA) which can be found at Indiana Code I.C. 4-21.5-3.
    Other Resources

    Indiana Department of Labor


 

Iowa Division of Labor ServicesIowa Flag

  • 1000 E Grand Avenue
  • Des Moines, Iowa 50319-0209
  • (515) 242-5870
  • (515) 281-7995

  • Michael A. Mauro, Labor Commissioner
  • (515) 281-3447
Iowa Occupational Safety and Health Enforcement
  • Stephen Slater, Deputy Labor
  • Commissioner/IOSH Administrator
  • (515) 281-3469


IOSH Consultation & Education

  • Joseph Mullen, Project Manager
  • (515) 281-0593


For reporting fatalities and catastrophes in Iowa call: (877) 242-6742

State OSH Plan Web:
http://www.iowaworkforce.org/labor/index.html


About the Iowa State Plan [Iowa State Plan Website]

The Iowa Division of Labor Services, Iowa Occupational Safety and Health Act was passed by the Iowa Legislature and signed by the Governor on April 20, 1972. In accordance with Section 18(b) of the Federal OSHA law, Iowa submitted its State Plan on July 19, 1972. On July 20, 1973, the Assistant Secretary published a notice granting initial approval of the Iowa Plan as a developmental plan. On September 14, 1976, the Assistant Secretary certified that Iowa had satisfactorily completed all development steps. The Assistant Secretary determined that the State of Iowa's occupational safety and health program is at least as effective as the Federal program in providing safe and healthful employment and places of employment and meets the criteria for final State Plan approval in section 18(e) of the Act and implementing regulations at 29 CFR 1902. Accordingly, the Iowa plan was granted final approval on July 2, 1985.

Jurisdiction

The Iowa State Plan applies to all public and private sector places of employment in the State with the exception of private sector maritime activities; marine terminals; longshoring; federal government-owned, contractor-operated military/munitions facilities; bridge construction projects spanning the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers between Iowa and other states; federal government employers and employees; and the United States Postal Service; which are subject to Federal OSHA jurisdiction. The U.S. Department of Labor, Employment Standards Administration exercises jurisdiction with respect to field sanitation and temporary labor camps. See 29 CFR 1952.164.

Regulations and Standards

States must set job safety and health standards that are "at least as effective" as Federal OSHA standards. States have the option to promulgate standards covering hazards not addressed by federal standards. Iowa has a limited number of state-specific standards. A list of these standards is provided below with a Web link for additional details.

IOSHA Administrative Rules (875)

  • Chapter 29 - Sanitation and Shelter Rules for Railroad Employees
  • Chapter 110 - Hazardous Chemical Risks Right to Know - General Provisions
  • Chapter 130 - Community Right to Know
  • Chapter 140 - Public Safety/Emergency Response Right to Know
  • Chapter 155 - Asbestos Removal and Encapsulation
Enforcement Programs

Iowa Occupational Safety and Health Enforcement is responsible for the enforcement of Iowa's Occupational Safety and Health Standards. Compliance officers inspect workplaces to assure there are not hazardous conditions that threaten the safety or health of workers. Should such a condition be found, citations may be issued. Inspections may be the result of regular scheduling, imminent danger reports, accident or fatality reports, employee complaints, or a referral. Additional information can be found at the Iowa State Plan Website.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

Iowa offers a number of voluntary and cooperative programs focused on reducing injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. Iowa offers safety and health assistance to employers through a voluntary on-site consultation program. The State also operates successful VPP and SHARP programs. More information on these programs is available at Iowa State Plan Website.

Policies and Procedures

Iowa OSHA follows federal OSHA's Compliance Letters (CPLs), Memos, Instructions and Directives as guidelines to provide assistance to compliance officers, employers and employees on the enforcement of OSHA standards. Most federal CPLs are adopted by Iowa OSHA. A listing of CPLs that have been developed and adopted by Iowa OSHA as "equally effective as" federal OSHA can be found at the Iowa State Plan Website.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

The IOSH Field Operations Manual contains information about post inspection procedures to include informal conferences and contest procedures with the Employment Appeal Board.

The three-member Employment Appeal Board is appointed by the Governor and serves as an independent administrative adjudicatory body to hear contests of citations, penalties and abatement periods issued by the Iowa Occupational Safety and Health Administration (IOSHA). Cases may be heard by the Board itself or assigned to Administrative Law Judges. Decisions of the Administrative Law Judges may then be appealed to the Board. The Board's decision may be appealed to the Iowa District Court and ultimately to the Iowa Supreme Court. The three members of the Board are appointed to represent employers, employees and the general public.

The Employment Appeal Board can be contacted at:

Iowa Department of Inspections and Appeals

Safety   Training

Equipment

Consultants

Lucas State Office Building
UpIcon321 East 12th Street
Des Moines, Iowa 50319-0083
(515) 281-7102
(515) 242-6863
Other Resources
 

Kentucky Department of LaborKentucky Flag

  • 1047 US HWY 127 South, Suite 4
  • Frankfort, KY 40601
  • (502) 564-0684
  • (502) 564-5387 
  • Larry L. Roberts, Secretary
  • (502) 564-0684 
  • Rocky Comito, Deputy Secretary
  • (502) 564-0684
  • (502) 564-5387


Department of Workplace Standards
  • Anthony Russell, Commissioner
  • (502) 564-3070
  • (502) 564-5387 
  • Chuck Stribling, CSP, OSH Federal-State Coordinator
  • (502) 564-3070

Department of Workplace Standards
  • Anthony Russell, Commissioner
  • (502) 564-3070
  • (502) 564-5387
  • Chuck Stribling, CSP, OSH Federal-State Coordinator
  • (502) 564-3070


About the Kentucky State Plan [Kentucky State Plan Website]

The Kentucky Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Program, by means of Kentucky Revised Statutes Chapter 338 and through a state plan approved by OSHA, maintains authority for enforcement, standards promulgation, and on-site consultation and training services related to job safety and health in accordance with Section 18 of the OSH Act of 1970. The Kentucky OSH Program was initially approved in 1973 and granted final state plan approval June 13, 1985. Kentucky was the first state plan approved under the revised federal benchmarks.

On June 2, 2008, Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear signed Executive Order 2008-472, which re-established the Kentucky Labor Cabinet, effective June 16, 2008. The purpose of the reorganization was to streamline state services and concentrate limited resources on frontline, regulatory activity. The duties, personnel, and budgets of all organizational entities within, attached to, or associated with the former Department of Labor in the Environmental and Public Protection Cabinet were transferred to the Labor Cabinet, headed by a secretary appointed by the Governor. The responsibility for enforcing occupational safety and health law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky is now vested in the Labor Cabinet and assigned to the Department of Workplace Standards, headed by a commissioner appointed by the secretary with the approval of the Governor. Kentucky's revised OSH Program consists of the OSH federal-state coordinator, standards specialists, and support staff, all of whom are attached to the commissioner's office; the Division of Occupational Safety and Health Compliance; and the Division of Occupational Safety and Health Education and Training.

Jurisdiction

The Kentucky OSH Program exercises jurisdiction over all private and public sector employers and employees within the State except private sector maritime activities, Tennessee Valley Authority facilities, military personnel, U.S. Postal Service employees, employees working at properties ceded to the U.S. government, employees of the federal government, and issues of field sanitation and temporary labor camps in agriculture, except for agricultural temporary labor camps associated with egg, poultry or red meat production, or the post harvest processing of agricultural or horticultural commodities. See 29 CFR 1952.235.

Regulations and Standards

States must maintain job safety and health standards that are "at least as effective as" comparable federal standards. States may promulgate standards that are more stringent than the comparable federal standards or promulgate standards covering hazards not addressed by federal standards.

The Kentucky OSH Standards Board is a thirteen (13) member body empowered to adopt, modify, or repeal OSH standards in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The Board is chaired by the Secretary of the Labor Cabinet. The remaining twelve (12) members are appointed by the Governor to equally represent agriculture, labor, management, and the safety and health profession.

Kentucky's OSH regulations are promulgated by means of Kentucky Administrative Regulations. They consist of state-specific regulations unique to Kentucky, OSHA regulations incorporated with state-specific provisions, and OSHA regulations incorporated without change. In general industry, Kentucky has state specific requirements regarding:

  • Batteries
  • Electrical Testing
  • Safety Belts, Lanyards, and Life Lines
  • Off Highway Motor Vehicles and Equipment
  • Rollover Protective Structures and Overhead Equipment
  • Fire Apparatus and Fire Department Facilities
  • Refuse Collection and Compaction Equipment
  • Receiving and Unloading Bulk Hazardous Liquids
  • Employers Responsibilities Where Employees are Exposed to Toxic Substances
  • Reporting Amputations or In Patient Hospitalizations
  • Guarding Floor and Wall Openings
  • Occupational Noise
  • Flammable and Combustible Liquids
  • Control of Hazardous Energy
  • Medical Services and First Aid
  • Powered Industrial Trucks
  • Mechanical Power Presses
  • Selection and Use of Work Practices (electrical)
  • 4,4-Methulene bis (2-Chloroaniline)
  • Laboratory Activities
  • Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records
  • Bloodborne Pathogens

Kentucky has state specific construction requirements regarding:

  • Safety and Testing of Supply Lines in Excess of 600 Volts
  • Refuse Collection and Compaction Equipment
  • Receiving and Unloading Bulk Hazardous Liquids
  • Employers Responsibilities Where Employees are Exposed to Toxic Substances
  • Reporting Amputations or In Patient Hospitalizations
  • Confined Space Entry
  • Bloodborne Pathogens
  • Fall Protection
  • Material Hoists, Personnel Hoists, and Elevators
  • Steel Erection
  • Blasting and Use of Explosives
  • Power Transmission and Distribution

The regulations are available on the Kentucky State Plan website.

Enforcement Programs

The Division of of Occupational Safety and Health is responsible for the enforcement of Kentucky's OSH standards. Compliance officers inspect workplaces to assure there are no hazardous conditions that threaten the safety or health of workers. Should such a condition be found, citations may be issued. Inspections may be the result of regular scheduling, imminent danger reports, accident or fatality reports, employee complaints, or a referral. Additional information can be found in the Kentucky State Plan - Compliance Section of the website.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

The Division of Occupational Safety and Health Education and Training provides timely expert safety and health assistance to employers and employees to assure every worker in the Commonwealth safe and healthful working conditions. In addition to consultative surveys, the Division offers training and a number of voluntary and cooperative programs, such as VPP, CPP, SHARP, OSP, and SPP, focused on reducing injury and illness. Additional information can be found in the Kentucky State Plan - Education and Training section of the website.

Policies and Procedures

Explanation of Kentucky's policies and procedures can be found by contacting the Department of Workplace Standards or visiting the Kentucky State Plan Website.

Safety Training

Equipment

Consultants

Informal Conferences and Appeals

The OSH Review Commission is an independent quasi-judicial UpIconbody empowered to hear and rule on OSH contested cases. The Commission is administratively attached to the Labor Cabinet; and, consists of three (3) members appointed by the Governor to represent the interests of employees, employers, and the OSH profession. First level contests are heard and ruled upon by hearing officers employed by the Kentucky Attorney General's office. Decisions of the KOSH Review Commission.

Other Resources

Publications and Posters 

 

 Maryland Department of LaborMaryland Flag

  • Ron DeJuliis, Commissioner
  • 1100 North Eutaw Street, Room 606
  • Baltimore, Maryland 21201-2206
  •  (410) 767-2241
  •  (410) 767-2986
Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH)
  • 10946 Golden West Drive, Suite 160
  • Hunt Valley, MD 21031

 

  • Eric Uttenreither, Assistant Commissioner
  • 10946 Golden West Drive, Suite 160
  • Hunt Valley, MD 21031
  •  (410) 527-4499
  •  (410) 527-4481

 

  • Mischelle Vanreusel, Program Manager
  •  (410) 527-2064
  •  (410) 527-4483

 

About the Maryland State Plan [Maryland State Plan Website]

The state of Maryland, under agreement with OSHA, operates an occupational safety and health program in accordance with Section 18 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The Maryland plan was certified on February 15, 1980 and was granted final state plan approval on July 18, 1985.

The Maryland Occupational Safety and Health Program (MOSH) is part of the Maryland Division of Labor and Industry. Ron DeJuliis is currently Commissioner of Labor and Industry. Maryland OSHA is headquartered in Hunt Valley, Maryland and has field offices in Easton and Hagerstown.

MOSH's mission is to assure, as far as possible, safe and healthful working conditions for the two million plus working men and women in the state of Maryland. This mission is attained through implementation of multiple tools including: adoption of standards that are as effective as OSHA's standards, state-specific standards development, enforcement, human resource initiatives, compliance assistance, training and education, outreach, partnerships, alliances, voluntary protection programs, development of research and statistical targeting capabilities, a strategic management focus, and information technology strategies that track and optimize overall agency performance.

MOSH operates its programs under state law with OSHA approval, matching grants, and oversight to ensure programs are "at least as effective" as OSHA. MOSH retains the flexibility to tailor programs to address Maryland's local issues and concerns.

Jurisdiction

MOSH has jurisdiction over all public and private sector places of employment in the state of Maryland, with the exception of federal employees, the United States Postal Service, private sector maritime activities (shipyard employment, marine terminals, and longshoring), and military bases, which are subject to federal jurisdiction. See 29 CFR 1952.215.

Regulations and Standards

In order to avoid duplication of regulatory requirements and facilitate compliance by Maryland employers, MOSH has adopted the Federal Occupational Safety and Health Standards contained in Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Part 1910 (General Industry), Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Part 1926 (Construction), and Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Part 1928 (Agriculture). In addition to these federal standards, MOSH has adopted several regulations that are unique to Maryland.

Enforcement Programs

MOSH conducts a strong, fair and effective enforcement program that includes inspecting worksites and issuing citations and penalties for violations of health and safety standards. Priorities for inspections include reports of imminent danger, fatalities, catastrophes, accidents and employee complaints, investigation of whistleblower activities, referrals from other government agencies and targeted areas of concern.

The Compliance Unit maintains offices in Easton, Hunt Valley, and Hagerstown. A telephone paging system in effect during evening and weekend hours ensures that compliance officers are available around the clock to respond appropriately to emergency situations.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs
  • On-site Consultation Programs - MOSH offers a free consultation service, targeted at small businesses in high-hazard industries, that assists employers in identifying and correcting workplace hazards and establishing safety and health management systems.
  • Cooperative Programs/Compliance Assistance - MOSH enters into voluntary relationships (VPP, SHARP, Alliances, and Cooperative Compliance Partnerships) with employers to encourage, assist, and recognize their efforts to increase worker safety and health. These programs promote effective safety and health management and leverage the agency's resources to share best practices with secondary and tertiary contractors.
  • Outreach, Training and Education, and Information Services - MOSH develops and provides a broad array of outreach products and services, education and training materials and courses that promote occupational safety and health.
Policies and Procedures

The MOSH Field Operations Manual establishes the policies and procedures that govern MOSH compliance (enforcement) activities. MOSH's program directives contain additional policies and procedures.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

A notice of violation, including a civil penalty, is a final order unless the employer files with the Commissioner a timely written notice of intent to contest. An employer who wishes to contest a citation or a proposed penalty may take the following actions:

Notice of Contest:

  • An affected employer has 15 work days from receipt of a citation, excluding weekends and State holidays, in which to notify the Commissioner in writing that the employer contests the citation, proposed penalty, or both. The employer may indicate in the notice of contest whether the hearing is to be held in Baltimore City, the county where the violation allegedly occurred, or an office that the Commissioner designates as a regional office.
  • An affected employee or representative may participate as a party in a hearing.
  • An affected employee or representative has 15 work days after issuance of a citation, excluding weekends and State holidays, in which to notify the Commissioner, in writing, that he or she believes the period of time set in the citation for abatement of the violation is unreasonable.
  • An employer may not contest a proposed abatement date, but under certain circumstances may file a written Petition for Modification of Abatement Date.

Informal Conference:

  • An affected employer, or an affected employee or representative, may request an informal conference to discuss issues raised by the inspection, citation, proposed penalty, or notice of contest. A request for an informal conference does not delay the 15 workday period for filing a notice of contest.
  • The Commissioner may permit an affected employer to participate in an informal conference requested by an employee or representative, and may permit an affected employee or representative to participate in an informal conference requested by the employer.

Pre-hearing Conference:

  • After a notice of contest has been filed and a hearing date set, a party to the contest may request a pre-hearing conference with the Assistant Attorney General assigned to the case to exchange information, attempt to resolve or narrow the issues, or discuss settlement of the case. A request for a pre-hearing conference must be made well in advance of the scheduled hearing. A scheduled hearing ordinarily will not be postponed to allow the parties to have a pre-hearing conference.
  • All parties may participate in a pre-hearing conference.

Administrative Hearing:

When a citation is contested, the Commissioner of Labor and Industry may appoint a Hearing Examiner to hold a hearing and prepare a record and report. Specific procedures govern the conduct of a MOSH administrative hearing. These procedures are set out in the MOSH Act and regulations.

A Hearing Examiner's written report becomes a final order of the Commissioner unless within 15 work days after the report is submitted, the Commissioner orders a review of the proceedings, or the employer or employee or representative files a request for the Commissioner to review the report.

Upon receipt of a request for review, the Commissioner may review the report with or without a hearing. The Commissioner may affirm, modify, or vacate a citation or proposed penalty or direct other appropriate relief.

Safety  Training

Equipment

Consultants

For additional information, contact Felicia Weeks, (410) 527-4454.

UpIconAppeal of the Commissioner's Order:

A final order of the Commissioner may be appealed to the appropriate Circuit Court.

Other Resources

MOSH - Research and Statistics

MOSH also offers information in Spanish.

MOSH Publications

 
 Michigan Department of Labor and Economic GrowthMichigan Flag
  • Steve Arwood, Director
  •  (517) 241-7124
  •  (517) 373-2129
Michigan Occupational Safety & Health Administration
  • 7150 Harris Drive
  • P.O. Box 30643
  • Lansing, Michigan 48909-8143

 

  • Martha Yoder, Director
  •  (517) 322-1817
  •  (517) 322-1775


Contact MIOSHA


About the Michigan State Plan [Michigan State Plan Website]

The mission of the MIOSHA program is to help assure the safety and health of Michigan workers. The agency vision is to enhance the quality of life and contribute to the economic vitality in Michigan by serving as an effective leader in occupational safety and health. Provide through inclusion of staff and stakeholder creativity and commitment:

  • Credible, customized and responsible consultation, education and training,
  • Firm, fair and targeted enforcement,
  • Cooperative agreements with individual employers and employee and employer organizations, and
  • Relevant, fact-based standards promulgation.

MIOSHA is responsible for assuring safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women in Michigan. The agency administers the MIOSH Act, Act 154 of 1974, as amended. Safe and healthy work environments are achieved through a combination of enforcement, outreach, and collaborative partnerships. The agency also licenses asbestos contractors and certifies asbestos workers. The agency administers the MIOSHA program through an organization comprised of: the Construction Safety and Health Division, the General Industry Safety and Health Division, the Consultation Education and Training Division, the MIOSHA Appeals Division, the Management and Technical Services Division, and program administration.

MIOSHA Mission & Vision Statement (PDF)

MIOSHA History

MIOSHA Strategic Plan

Jurisdiction

MIOSHA applies to all public and private sector places of employment in the State, with the exception of Federal employees, the United States Postal Service (USPS), domestic employment, maritime, and mining, which are subject to Federal OSHA jurisdiction. See 29 CFR 1952.265.

General Industry Safety & Health Division

Construction Safety & Health Division

Regulations and Standards

MIOSHA Standards and Legislation

Enforcement Programs

MIOSHA has two enforcement divisions: the General Industry Safety and Health Division (GISHD) and the Construction Safety and Health Division (CSHD).

The GISHD conducts safety and health inspections and investigations in all places of employment within the state of Michigan except those operations and activities covered by the Construction Safety and Health Division. This includes both private employers and all levels of public sector employers except facilities of the federal government. The division responds to complaints from employees or their representatives, investigates accidents including fatalities and catastrophes, and responds to referrals of unsafe conditions from other government agencies. In addition, the division conducts unannounced inspections at facilities throughout the state in accordance with current priority inspection guidelines. Citations, some with proposed penalties, may be issued to employers as a result of these inspections or investigations. Extensive tracking is done to ensure that the employers make the appropriate corrections to ensure the safety and health of their employees.

The CSHD primarily conducts inspections to enforce occupational safety and health standards in the construction industry, and oversees licensing of asbestos abatement contractors and accreditation of asbestos workers. Enforcement of standards includes: inspection and hazard identification, issuance of citations for violations, and penalty assessment, if any. Types of inspections include: accidents (fatal and non-fatal), employee complaints, general scheduled, referrals, and follow-up. The division enforces safety and health standards in construction workplaces defined in the MIOSH Act as work activity designated in major groups 15, 16, and 17, of the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Manual or code 23 or the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). All construction types are inspected including projects such as: road and bridge projects; sewer, water, gas, and electric utility lines; power plants; waste and water treatment plants; high rise construction; factory and other building additions; communication and power transmission towers; and single family homes.

Complaints for Michigan OSHA can be filed two ways:

Online: Complaints filed electronically will be handled as nonformal complaints and will not result in an onsite inspection.

Written Complaints (PDF): Formal complaints must include an employee signature and are more likely to result in onsite inspections. Signed complaint forms can be mail or faxed to MIOSHA.

MIOSHA Compliance Programs

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

MIOSHA's Consultation Education and Training (CET) Division educates employers and employees in safety and health awareness so they are better prepared to recognize, control and prevent hazardous working conditions. A statewide staff of experienced, professional occupational safety consultants, construction safety specialists, and industrial hygienists provide CET services. CET provides workplace safety and health training and consultations to employers and employees throughout Michigan. CET provides the ability for employers to learn proactively about the workplace safety and health rules that affect their workplace, to understand best practices for creating and maintaining a safe work environment, and to strive for program recognition of significant workplace safety and health program performance.

MIOSHA Consultation Education & Training Division

Policies and Procedures

MIOSHA Policies & Procedures

Informal Conferences and Appeals

The MIOSHA Appeals Division provides employers, employees and the agency with fair, objective and professional services for resolution of contested MIOSHA cases. The MIOSH Act provides for a two-step appeal process for employers and/or employees to appeal any citations issued by the enforcement divisions. If the citations cannot be resolved through the informal conference process utilized by the enforcement divisions, the case is transmitted to the Appeals Division where pre-hearings and/or formal hearings are conducted. The MIOSHA Appeals Division can by contacted by calling (517) 322-1297 or the MIOSHA toll free line at 1-800-TO-MIOSH(A) (1-800-866-4674).

MIOSHA Appeals Division

Settling a MIOSHA Compliance Case (DOC)

MIOSHA Informal Settlement Agreement (DOC)

MIOSHA Information on First Appeal (DOC)

Address and Contact information, as well as website link, for Michigan Appeals authority:

M

Safety Training

Equipment

Consultants

ichigan State Office of Regulatory Reinvention (ORR)
UpIconOttawa Building
611 West Ottawa
Lansing, MI 48909

Hearings, Appeals, and Mediation

Other Resources

MIOSHA Recordkeeping and Statistics

MIOSHA Strategic Plan & Initiatives

MIOSHA Publications, Forms & Media

Inside MIOSHA

MIOSHA Laboratory & Equipment Services

 

Minnesota Department of Labor and IndustryMinnesotta Flag

Minnesota OSHA (MNOSHA)

  • 443 Lafayette Road North
  • St. Paul, Minnesota 55155-4307
  •  (651) 284-5050 | (877) 470-6742
  •  (651) 284-5741

  • Ken Peterson, Commissioner
  •  (651) 284-5010
  •  (651) 284-5721

 

  • Cindy Valentine, Workplace Safety Manager
  •  (651) 284-5602
  •  (651) 284-5724

 

  • James Krueger, Compliance Director MNOSHA Compliance
  •  (651) 284-5462
  •  (651) 284-5741


About the Minnesota State Plan [Minnesota State Plan Website]

The Minnesota Occupational Safety and Health program is administered by the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry. The department's Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Division is responsible for compliance program administration, conducting enforcement inspections, adoption of standards, and operation of other related OSHA activities. Workplace Safety Consultation provides consultation services, on request, to help employers prevent workplace accidents and diseases by identifying and correcting safety and health hazards, and operates several employer assistance programs.

Management and administration of Minnesota OSHA (MNOSHA) is the responsibility of the OSHA Management Team (OMT). The OMT is comprised of the five Minnesota OSHA Supervisors, two Minnesota OSHA area directors, and an administrative director. The mission of Minnesota OSHA (MNOSHA) is to make sure every worker in the State of Minnesota has a safe and healthful workplace. This mandate involves the application of a set of tools by MNOSHA including standards development, enforcement, compliance assistance, and training and education, which enable employers to maintain safe and healthful workplaces.

The largest industry in Minnesota is health care. Minnesota is also an agricultural state with the related grain handling and processing, dairy, poultry, and meat packing industries. The four largest manufacturing industries include industrial machinery, printing and publishing, food and kindred products, and forest products (paper, lumber, wood, etc.)

Jurisdiction

MNOSHA applies to all public and private sector places of employment in the State, with the exception of Federal employees, the United States Postal Service (USPS), and certain agricultural related operations (field sanitation and temporary labor camps), which are subject to Federal OSHA jurisdiction. See 29 CFR 1952.204.

Public-sector employers in Minnesota (with the exception of federal agencies and exclusive federal jurisdiction properties) are covered and are treated exactly as any other employer. Public-sector employers are subject to the same enforcement protocols as private sector employers including inspection scheduling, inspection procedures, complaint and nondiscrimination procedures, informal conference and contestation procedures, employee access to information provisions, recordkeeping, and voluntary compliance programs.

Regulations and Standards

"Minnesota Statutes, Chapter 182, Occupational Safety and Health" can be accessed from MNOSHA's website.

Minnesota OSHA generally adopts Federal OSHA standards by reference. With the exception of the standards listed below, all federal OSHA standards for General Industry (29 CFR Part 1910) and Construction (29 CFR Part 1926) have been adopted by Minnesota OSHA. Minnesota OSHA has also adopted state-specific standards which address hazards not covered by federal OSHA standards. See Minnesota Rules, Chapters 5205, 5206, 5207, 5210, and 5215.

Major differences between federal and MNOSHA regulations include:

  • Employee Right-to-Know (Minnesota Rules Chapter 5206) is enforced by MNOSHA instead of the federal Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200). Employee Right-to-Know covers harmful physical agents and infectious agents as well as hazardous substances and requires annual refresher training in addition to initial training. The rule covers employees in general industry, construction, maritime operations, and farming operations with more than 10 employees or a temporary labor camp.
  • Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs) (29 CFR 1910.1000 - Air Contaminants) (PDF). In 1989, federal OSHA revised its PELs under 1910.1000, which MNOSHA adopted. Although federal OSHA has since reverted to the pre-1989 PELs, MNOSHA still enforces the 1989 PELs for substances that are not covered by separate standards. (These are available on the MNOSHA website.)
  • Confined spaces (29 CFR 1910.146 and Minnesota Rules 5207.0300-0304). For general industry, Minnesota OSHA has adopted the federal Permit-Required Confined Spaces standard, 29 CFR 1910.146. For the construction industry, Minnesota OSHA enforces Minnesota Rules 5207.0300-0304.
  • Lockout Devices in Construction (Minnesota Rules 5207.0600). MNOSHA has adopted its own lockout/tagout standard for the construction industry. This standard is in addition to 29 CFR 1926.417, Lockout and Tagging of Circuits, and the portions of 29 CFR 1926 Subpart O, Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment and Marine Operations, which address the control of potential energy. Employers in general industry must comply with 29 CFR 1910.147, Control of Hazardous Energy.
  • Additional MNOSHA requirements. Minnesota OSHA has also adopted standards covering topics not addressed in federal OSHA standards. See All MNOSHA standards and rules.
Enforcement Programs

MNOSHA's current primary inspection emphasis industries include:

  • lead and silica;
  • wood product manufacturing;
  • furniture and related products manufacturing;
  • paper manufacturing;
  • plastics and rubber product manufacturing;
  • food manufacturing, and beverage and tobacco product manufacturing;
  • machinery manufacturing;
  • construction;
  • printing and related support activities, and publishing industries;
  • the public sector;
  • foundries;
  • meatpacking; and
  • nursing care facilities.

One strategy used by Minnesota OSHA to address hazards in the public sector is the development of a Special Emphasis inspection program. For example, when the Fire Brigade Standard was adopted in 1980, Minnesota OSHA established a Special Emphasis inspection program for fire departments. All fire departments in the state were listed and each year fire departments were randomly selected for a comprehensive inspection. There are approximately 800 fire departments in Minnesota, both paid and volunteer; all fire departments were inspected under this program over the course of several years.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

MNSTAR is a Minnesota Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) program that recognizes companies where managers and employees work together to develop safety and health management systems that go beyond basic compliance with all applicable OSHA standards and result in immediate and long-term prevention of job-related injuries and illnesses. Key elements of this comprehensive program include: management leadership and employee involvement; an allocation of resources to address safety issues; systems that identify and control workplace hazards; and a plan for employee safety training and education.

Workplace Safety Consultation, the MNOSHA consultation program, offers consultations on request to small private-sector employers and some public-sector employers to help them prevent workplace accidents and diseases.

In addition to the traditional enforcement and consultation activities, MNOSHA operates several specialized programs aimed at assisting employers in making their workplaces safer and more healthful including the Minnesota Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (MNSHARP), a voluntary, consultation-based program which assists small high-hazard employers in achieving safety and health improvements and recognizes them for doing so. MNOSHA also operates a Labor-Management Safety Committee Program, a Loggers' Safety Education Program, a Workplace Violence Prevention Program, and a Safety Grants Program. See Workplace Safety Consultation for more information about MNSHARP and the other programs.

Policies and Procedures

MNOSHA's catalog of policies and directives are available on CD by request. Contact MNOSHA.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

If an employer files a Notice of Contest within 20 calendar-days after receiving the citation, according to the instructions contained on the form and on the citation, an informal conference is arranged with the employer to discuss the issues of the case and determine if an out-of-court settlement can be negotiated. If an agreement is reached, a written settlement agreement will be prepared for both parties to sign. If not, the case will be scheduled for hearing before an administrative law judge. The employer and the employees have the right to participate in the hearing; the law does not require they be represented by attorneys. After the administrative law judge has ruled, any party to the case may request a further review by the appropriate District Court. Enabling legislation for the Minnesota OSHA program is codified in Minnesota Statutes Chapter 182. For information about the Occupational Safety and Health Review Board please visit MNOSHA's website.

Other Resources

Training and outreach programs on standards and other OSHA-related topics of general interest are made available to public as well as private sector employers and employees. Programs have been, and when requested will be, conducted for specific types of workplaces, such as fire departments, schools, correctional facilities, etc.

Although not specifically geared toward public sector employers and employees, the Loggers' Safety Education Program, one of the programs under Workplace Safety Consultation, has provided safety training to numerous public sector employers and employees, primarily from public works departments. The "logging work" done by these workers is not a daily activity but is usually related to cleanup following storms or other uncommon events and involves trees that are damaged and hazardous to work on. The training sessions cover the requirements of 29 CFR 

Safety  Training

Equipment

Consultants

1910.266, including personal protective equipment, chainsaw UpIconsafety and maintenance, and proper tree felling techniques.

The Minnesota Department of Health website includes health information in many categories, including asbestos in schools.

The Department of Public Safety, Division of Emergency Management, provides information for emergencies including county and statewide response plans.

The University of Minnesota Extension Service provides information on a broad range of topics including solid waste, pesticide safety, and indoor environmental issues such as air quality and air systems. 


 

 Nevada Division of Industrial RelationsNevada Flag

  • Department of Business & Industry
  • 1301 N Green Valley Pkwy, Suite #200
  • Henderson, NV 89074 
  • Don Soderberg, Administrator/State Plan Designee
  • Bio
  •  (702) 486-9000
  •  (702) 486-9172

Nevada OSHA
  • 1301 N. Green Valley Parkway, Suite 200
  • Henderson, NV 89074
  •  (702) 486-9020
  •  (702) 990-0365 
  • John Wanamaker, Chief Administrative Officer 
Reno Office
  • 4600 Kietzke Lane, Suite F-153
  • Reno, NV 89502
  •  (775) 824-4600
  •  (775) 688-1378 
Nevada OSHA website
  • Nevada Safety Consultation and Training Section (SCATS)
  • 1301 N. Green Valley Parkway, Suite 200
  • Henderson, Nevada 89074
  •  (702) 486-9140
  •  (702) 990-0362 
  • Todd Shultz, Chief Administrative Officer

      SCATS website


About the Nevada State Plan [Nevada State Plan Website]

The State of Nevada, under an agreement with OSHA, operates an occupational safety and health program in accordance with Section 18 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. Initial approval of the Nevada state plan was published on January 4, 1974, and final approval was published on April 18, 2000.

The Nevada State Plan is administered by the Division of Industrial Relations (DIR), Department of Business and Industry. Within the DIR, an enforcement section and consultation section have been established. Enforcement is provided by the Nevada Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Nevada OSHA), and Consultation is provided by the Nevada Safety Consultation and Training Section (SCATS).

Nevada OSHA and SCATS are headquartered in Henderson and have offices in Henderson, Reno and Elko.

Jurisdiction

The Nevada State Plan applies to all public and private sector employers in the State, with the exception of Federal employees, the United State Postal Service (USPS), private sector maritime, employment on Indian Lands, and areas of exclusive Federal jurisdiction. See 29 CFR 1952.295.

Regulations and Standards

Nevada adopts federal OSHA standards by reference and enforces OSHA standards contained within 29 CFR, parts 1910 (General Industry), 1926 (Construction) and 1928 (Agriculture). In addition, Nevada has adopted additional requirements to include: safety programs, cranes, steel erection, construction projects, asbestos, explosives, ammonium perchlorate and photovoltaic system projects. Nevada's Occupational Safety and Health Standards and additional requirements can be accessed on the Nevada OSHA website.

Enforcement Programs

Nevada OSHA conducts inspections to ensure that employers are complying with safety and health standards.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

The Nevada Safety Consultation and Training Section (SCATS) provides assistance to private and public employers through on-site safety and health consultative surveys, telephone support, publications and educational outreach. The consultative surveys include the identification of hazardous working conditions, program evaluations, industrial hygiene monitoring, and informal training. SCATS offers a wide variety of compliance assistance materials such as the Nevada OSHA poster in English and Spanish, Fact Sheets, Safety Tips, Video Lending Library, Publications and Brochures. Formal classroom training is also conducted every month on safety and health regulatory awareness and hazard recognition. Check the SCATS website for the latest training schedule or call the phone number listed in the contact section.

Nevada offers voluntary and cooperative programs to employers such as the Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP), the Alliance Program and Voluntary Protection Program (VPP). Call SCATS for information on Nevada's Alliance program and SHARP; call Nevada OSHA for information on VPP.

Policies and Procedures

Nevada OSHA follows an Operations Manual (PDF) comparable to the federal Field Inspection Reference Manual (FIRM) which provides policy guidance for its enforcement program.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

Pursuant to Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) 618.6488, the employer, any affected employee or the employee representative many request an informal conference.

An employer who wishes to contest a citation or an employee who wishes to contest an abatement date must submit a written objection to Nevada OSHA within fifteen working days of receiving the citation (Nevada Revised Statute 618.475). The objection will then be forwarded to the Occupational Safety and Health Review Board (Board) for disposition. The Board consists of five members appointed by the Governor and meets only at the call of the Chairman. The Board provides

Safety   Training

Equipment

Consultants

administrative review of appeals for contested citations issued UpIconby Nevada OSHA and affected employees are entitled to participate in hearings before the Board. Decisions of the Board may be appealed to the appropriate State District Court.
Nevada Occupational Safety and Health Review Board
Scarpello and Huss Ltd.
600 E. Williams Street, Suite 300
Carson City, NV 89701-4052
(775) 882-4577
(775) 882-0810
Other Resources

Nevada Division of Industrial Relations

 

NOTE: The New Jersey PEOSH program covers the workplace safety and health of public sector employees only. Private sector employees in New Jersey are covered by  Federal OSHA 


New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce DevelopmentNew Jersey Flag

Public Employees Occupational Safety and Health (PEOSH) Office
  • One John Fitch Plaza - State Office Building Campus
  • P.O. Box 110
  • Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0110
  • (609) 633-3896
  • (609) 292-3749

 

  • Harold J. Wirths, Commissioner
  • (609) 292-2975

 

  • John Monahan, Assistant Commissioner
  • (609) 292-2313


Division of Public Safety and Occupational Safety and Health (PSOSH)

 


For all health-related matters, please contact:

State of New Jersey
Department of Health and Senior Services
  • One John Fitch Plaza
  • P.O. Box 360
  • Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0360
  • (609) 984-1863
  • (609) 984-2779

 

  • Mary E. O'Dowd, Commissioner
  • (609) 292-7837
Consumer, Environmental and Occupational Health Service (CEOHS)
  • Joe Eldridge, Director
  • (609) 826-4920
Public Employees Occupational Safety and Health (PEOSH) Office


About the New Jersey State Plan [New Jersey State Plan Website - SafetyHealth]

The Public Employee Occupational Safety and Health Program (PEOSH), by authority established under the PEOSH Act of 1995 (N.J.S.A 34:6A-25 et seq., enacted in 1984 and amended on July 25, 1995) is responsible for promoting the health and safety for approximately 500,000 State and Local government employees in the State. The New Jersey Plan received initial plan approval on January 11, 2001. The Plan designates the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development as the State agency responsible for administering the Plan throughout the State. Under this enabling legislation, the Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development has full authority to enforce and administer all laws and rules protecting the safety and health of all employees of the state and its political subdivisions in the State, as well the responsibility to adopt all applicable federal standards and maintain "at least as effective" as performance requirements. The Commissioner of Health and Senior Services has authority for occupational health matters including the authority to conduct health inspections, investigations and related activities, such as health consultation visits and training.

Jurisdiction

The New Jersey State Plan applies to all State, County and Local government agencies, public authorities, fire departments, and school districts.

Federal OSHA maintains jurisdiction over all private sector workplaces; federal agencies; maritime employers such as shipyards, marine terminals, and longshoring; military facilities; Indian sovereignty workplaces; and the U.S. Postal Service.

Regulations and Standards

States must set job safety and health standards that are "at least as effective" as Federal OSHA standards. States may promulgate standards that are more stringent than the comparable federal standards or promulgate standards covering hazards not addressed by federal standards.

The PEOSH Program has adopted identically all Federal OSHA standards and regulations applicable to public sector employment, with the exception of the following:

  • Hazard Communication Program - 1910.1200 - PEOSH modified OSHA's standard to include specific provisions of the State's Right-to-Know Law regarding fact sheets on chemicals - State Standard NJAC 12:100-7
  • Fire Brigade 1910.156 - State Standard NJAC 12:100-10

In addition, the New Jersey Plan provides for the adoption of alternative or different occupational safety and health standards by the Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development in consultation with the Commissioner of Health and Senior Services, the Commissioner of Community Affairs, and the Public Employees Occupational Safety and Health Advisory Board, where no Federal standards are applicable to the conditions or circumstances or where standards more stringent than the federal are deemed advisable.

Currently, PEOSH has two State-initiated Standards, administered by the Department of Health and Senior Services:

  • Indoor Air Quality - NJAC 12:100-13
  • Indoor Firing Ranges - NJAC 12:100-8

The Hazard Communication Program, Standards for Firefighters, Indoor Air Quality and Indoor Firing Ranges standards are part of the PEOSH Act.

Enforcement Programs

PEOSH adopted the federal Field Inspection Reference Manual (FIRM) (PDF) with modifications specific for public sector enforcement.

The program is administered by two departments with respective subdivisions as follows:

  • Department of Labor and Workforce Development (LWD) - Responsible for the administration of the program and its enforcement procedures, including standards adoption, compliance with all federal program changes and all safety related matters. Subdivided into enforcement and consultation/training and education divisions.
  • Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) - Responsible for the enforcement of all health-related standards and to encourage employers in their efforts to improve workplace environmental conditions. Subdivided into enforcement and consultation/training and education divisions.
Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

PEOSH offers a number of voluntary and free cooperative programs focusing on reducing injuries, illnesses and fatalities in the public sector, including workplace hazard assessment surveys, training and outreach seminars. All consultation services are conducted separate and apart from enforcement activities. PEOSH has also a Safety and Health Achievement and Recognition Program (SHARP) specifically tailored for public sector workplaces in New Jersey.

Additional information on the State Plan's Public Sector Consultation Services can be found at the following numbers and web links:

New Jersey also has an agreement with OSHA, under Section 21(d) of the OSH Act to provide free onsite consultation services to the private sector. For more information on this service, please contact the Onsite Consultation Program at (609) 984-0785 or online.

Policies and Procedures

PEOSH's Program Safety Directives

PEOSH's Program Health Directives 

Informal Conferences and Appeals

Under Section 34:6A-42 of the PEOSH Act, employers, employees and other affected parties may seek informal review with the Department of Labor and Workforce Development relative to a notice of violation/Order to Comply, the reasonableness of the abatement period, any penalty and/or may seek formal administrative review with the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission, a board appointed by the Governor and authorized under section 34:6A.42 of the New Jersey Act to hear and rule on appeals of orders to comply and any penalties proposed. Any employer, employee or employee representative affected by a determination of the Commissioner may file a contest within fifteen (15) working days of the issuance of an order to comply. The Review Commission will issue an order, based on a finding of fact, affirming, modifying, or vacating the commissioner's order to comply or the proposed penalty, or directing other appropriate relief, and the order shall become final 45 days after its issuance.

Safety Training

Equipment

Consultants

Judicial review of the decision of the Review Commission may UpIconbe sought at the Appellate Division of the Superior Court. For further information you can access the Review Commission section of the PEOSH Act using the web link below. You can also contact the office at (609) 633-3896.
Other Resources

Publications, Posters and Forms can be found at the following links:

 

New Mexico Environment DepartmentNew Mexico Flag

  • 1190 St. Francis Drive, Suite N4050
  • Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502
  • (505) 827-2855
  • (505) 827-2836
Mailing Address:
  • P.O. Box 5469
  • Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502 
  • F. David Martin, Secretary
  • Butch Tongate, Deputy Secretary

Occupational Health and Safety Bureau
  • Robert Genoway, Chief
  • (505) 476-8700
  • (505) 476-8734
Compliance Program
  • Herman Hernandez, Acting Compliance Program Manager
  • (505) 476-8711
  • (505) 827-0310
Consultation Program
  • Harry Buysse, Consultation
  • (505) 476-8720
  • (505) 476-8734
    New Mexico State Plan Website:
About the New Mexico State Plan [New Mexico State Plan Website]

The State of New Mexico, under an agreement with OSHA, operates an occupational safety and health program in accordance with Section 18 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The New Mexico state plan was initially approved on December 10, 1975, and received state plan certification on December 4, 1984.

The New Mexico Occupational Health and Safety Bureau (OHSB) is a part of the New Mexico Environment Department, headed by the Secretary. The main office is located in Santa Fe, with satellite offices in Albuquerque and Las Cruces.

Jurisdiction

The New Mexico OHSB exercises jurisdiction for all private and public sector employers and employees throughout the State of New Mexico except for maritime industries (long shoring, ship building, and ship breaking); mining operations; Federal civilian employees; employment on military bases, Indian reservations, or areas of exclusive Federal jurisdiction; and U.S. Postal Service employees.

Regulations and Standards

States must maintain job safety and health standards that are "at least as effective" as comparable federal standards. States may promulgate standards that are more stringent than the comparable federal standards or promulgate standards covering hazards not addressed by federal standards.

New Mexico adopts amendments to incorporated federal standards, by reference. These become enforceable the date they are available on the OSHA website. New standards require a public hearing before the Environmental Improvement Board, a seven member body appointed by the Governor and empowered to adopt, modify, or repeal OHS standards and regulations.

New Mexico has adopted the following unique State standards.

  • Public Sector Firefighting
  • Convenience Stores
  • Field Sanitation
  • Short-Handled Hoes

These standards are available on the New Mexico Environment Department's Regulations page.

Enforcement Programs

The Compliance Section is responsible for the enforcement of New Mexico's OHS standards and regulations. New Mexico has its own Field Operations Manual (FOM) outlining enforcement policies and procedures. The NMFOM is available on the State's website.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

New Mexico offers a number of voluntary and cooperative programs focused on reducing injuries, illnesses, and fatalities, including the on-site consultation program; Zia Star VPP program; partnerships; and alliances. More information on these programs is available on the State's website.

Policies and Procedures

Explanation of New Mexico's policies and procedures is available by contacting the Occupational Health and Safety Bureau.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

Employers may request an Informal Conference prior to the expiration of the 15-day contest period after receiving citations. Violations, penalties, and abatement dates may be adjusted at this level. If an employer contests the citations, an Informal Administrative Review is held, at which settlement may be reached. If the issues are not settled, the case goes before the Occupational Health and Safety Review Commission.

The New Mexico OHS Review Commission is an independent quasi-judicial body empowered to hear and to rule on OHS contested cases. The OHS Review Commission may affirm, modify, or revoke a citation, penalty, or abatement date. The Commission consists of three members appointed by the Governor to represent the interests of employees, employers, and the occupational safety and health profession. The Commission's decisions may be appealed to the State District Court and further to the New Mexico Supreme Court.

The OHS Review Commission meets only at the call of the chairman. However, any two members may petition the chairman to call a meeting. All questions regarding the Commission should be directed to:

Safety Training

Equipment

Consultants

Occupational Health and Safety Review Commission
UpIconJoyce Medina, Administrator
NMED Boards and Commissions
1190 S. St. Francis Drive
Room N-2153
Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502
(505) 827-2425
(505) 827-2836
Joyce Medina
Other Resources

Publications and Posters


NOTE: The New York PESH program covers the workplace safety and health of public sector employees only. Private sector employees in New York are covered by Federal OSHA


 New York Department of LaborNew York Flag

  • Peter Rivera, Commissioner
  • (518) 457-2746
  • (518) 457-5545
Division of Safety and Health
  • Public Employees Safety and Health (PESH) Bureau
  • Governor W. Averell Harriman State Building Campus
  • Building 12, Room 158
  • Albany, New York 12240
  • (518) 457-1263
  • (518) 457-5545

  • Division of Safety and Health (DOSH)
    • Eileen Franko, Acting Director
    • (518) 457-3518
    • (518) 457-5545
    Public Employees Safety and Health Bureau
  • Normand Labbe, Program Manager
  • (518) 457-1263
  • Normand Labbe

About the New York State Plan [New York State Plan Website]

The New York State Plan for Public Employee Safety and Health (PESH), by authority under Section 27(a) of the New York Labor Law, is responsible for promoting the health and safety for more than 2 million State and Local government employees in the State. The New York Plan received initial plan approval on June 1, 1984 and certification on August 16, 2006. The New York Department of Labor has been designated as the agency responsible for administering the plan throughout the State. The Commissioner of Labor has full authority to enforce and administer all laws and rules protecting the safety and health of all employees of the State and its political subdivisions. In addition to the plan's enforcement responsibilities, PESH provides free on-site consultation and training services to public sector agencies, upon request.

The PESH Program consists of one central office in Albany, New York and nine district offices located throughout the State: Albany, Binghamton, Syracuse, Utica, Rochester, Buffalo, White Plains, Garden City and New York City.

Jurisdiction

The New York State Plan applies to all public sector employers in the State, including: State, County, Town, and Village governments, as well as Public Authorities, School Districts, and Paid and Volunteer Fire Departments.

Federal OSHA maintains jurisdiction over all private sector workplaces; federal agencies; maritime employers such as shipyards, marine terminals, and longshoring; military facilities; Indian sovereignty workplaces; and the U.S. Postal Service.

Regulations and Standards

States must set job safety and health standards that are "at least as effective" as Federal OSHA standards. States may promulgate standards that are more stringent than the comparable federal standards or promulgate standards covering hazards not addressed by federal standards.

The PESH Program has adopted all Federal OSHA standards and regulations applicable to public sector employment, with the exception of the Recordkeeping Rule, 29 CFR 1904. New York promulgated and adopted an alternative approach to recordkeeping requirements, under section 801 and administrative instructions 901, with respective URL's listed below:

Recordkeeping Forms:

In addition, the New York Plan provides the Commissioner with the authority for the development of alternative and/or State-initiated standards to protect the safety and health of public employees, in consultation with the Hazard Abatement Board, or on his/her own initiative. The procedures for adoption of alternative standards contain criteria for consideration of expert technical advice and allow interested persons to request development of any standard and to participate in any hearing for the development or modification of standards.

As of October 1, 2007, PESH has been engaged in the rulemaking process for two State-initiated standards, as required by legislation passed by the State's Senate and Assembly and signed by the Governor. These two standards and their respective URL web links are as follows:

Enforcement Programs

PESH maintains the Field Operations Manual (FOM) (PDF) which provides policy guidance for its enforcement program. The Enforcement Branch conducts unannounced mandatory inspections which results in a "Notice of Violation and Order to Comply" for hazards and/or violations of OSHA standards. Abatement periods to comply with the violations are established and verification of abatement is required. Violations not complied during the abatement period are subject to a penalty, not exceed $200 per day until compliance is achieved.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

PESH offers a number of voluntary and free cooperative programs focusing on reducing injuries, illnesses and fatalities in the public sector, including workplace hazard assessment surveys, training and outreach seminars. All consultation services are conducted separate and apart from enforcement activities. PESH has also created Strategic Work Groups for identified high hazard jobs that work with employers to lower the incidence of injuries to employees. Currently, such groups have focused on the fire service, highway repair and construction, nursing homes and light rail services.

New York State also has an agreement with OSHA, under Section 21(d) of the OSH Act to provide free onsite consultation services to the private sector. For more information on this service, please contact the Onsite Consultation Program at (518) 457-2810.

Policies and Procedures

PESH's Program Directives and Forms

Informal Conferences and Appeals

Under the Plan, public employers and employees may seek formal administrative review of New York Department of Labor citations, including penalties and the reasonableness of abatement periods, by petitioning with the New York Industrial Board of Appeals (IBA) no later than 60 days after the issuance of the citation. The IBA is the independent State agency authorized by Section 27(a) (6) (c) of the New York Act to consider petitions from affected parties for review of the Commissioner of Labor's determinations. A contest does not automatically stay a notice of violation, penalty or abatement date; a stay must be granted by the IBA. Judicial review of any decision of the IBA may be sought pursuant to Article 78 of the New York Civil Practice Law.

Prior to contest, employers, employees and other affected parties may seek informal review of citations, penalties and abatement dates by the Department of Labor by requesting an informal conference in writing within 20 working days from the receipt of the citation. If the informal conference does not produce agreement, the affected party may seek formal administrative review with the IBA.

Public employees or their authorized representatives have the additional right under 12 NYCRR Part 805 (PDF) to contest the abatement period by filing a petition with the Commissioner within 15 working days of the posting of the citation by filing a petition with the Department of Labor, or later if good cause for late filing is shown. If the Commissioner denies the employee contest of abatement period under Part 805 (PDF) in whole or in part, the complaint will automatically be forwarded to the IBA for review. Under the IBA rules, public employees or their representatives may request permission to participate in an employer-initiated review process as "intervenors." The plan includes an April 28, 2006, assurance that should an employee or employee representative request intervenor status in an employer-initiated case, the State will appropriately inform the IBA of its support for the request. Should an employee's or employee representative's request for participation be denied, the State will seek immediate corrective action to guarantee the right to employee party status in employer-initiated cases.

The period fixed in the plan for contesting notices of violation is 60 calendar days, which is significantly longer than the 15 working day period allowed under the Federal OSHA program. However, New York has provided assurance, by Counsel's opinion of March 3, 1984, that it has the authority under Article 78 of the New York Civil Practice Law to obtain judicial enforcement of an uncontested order to comply upon expiration of the abatement period, regardless of whether the 60 day contest period has expired. New York has also assured that should the State Labor Department's interpretation be successfully challenged, appropriate legislative

Safety  Training

Equipment

Consultants

UpIconcorrection would be sought.
Other Resources

The New York State Plan Website contains information pertaining to: Publications, Posters and Forms, including the PESH Act, Job Safety and Health Poster, Complaint Form (PESH 7) and Petition for Modification of Abatement (PMA - Form SH 971).

 

North Carolina Department of Labor (NCDOL)North Carolina Flag

  • Occupational Safety and Health Division
  • 111 Hillsborough Street
  • Raleigh, NC 27601-1092
  • (919) 733-7166
  • Cherie Berry, Commissioner
  • Mailing Address:
  • North Carolina Department of Labor
  • Occupational Safety and Health Division
  • 1101 Mail Service Center
  • Raleigh, NC 27699-1101

Occupational Safety & Health Division


About the North Carolina State Plan [North Carolina State Plan Website]

The North Carolina Department of Labor (NCDOL) is charged with promoting the "health, safety and general well-being" of more than 4 million workers in the state. A commissioner of labor is elected every four years as head of the department and also serves on the Council of State. The commissioner has broad regulatory and enforcement powers to carry out the department's duties and responsibilities. The department is divided into three divisions: Administration, Occupational Safety and Health, and Standards and Inspections. The Occupational Safety and Health Division (OSH) is responsible for administering the Occupational Safety and Health Act.

The North Carolina State plan was initially approved on February 1, 1973 (38 FR 3041). On December 18, 1996, OSHA announced the final approval of the North Carolina State plan pursuant to section 18(e) and amended Subpart I of 29 CFR part 1952 to reflect the Assistant Secretary's decision (61 FR 66593).

Jurisdiction

The North Carolina Department of Labor exercises jurisdiction over all private and public sector employers and employees within the State, with the exception of Federal employees, the United States Postal Service (USPS), private sector maritime activities, employment on Indian reservations, railroad employment, and enforcement on military bases, and the American National Red Cross, which are subject to Federal OSHA jurisdiction. See 29 CFR 1952.155.

Regulations and Standards

States must set job safety and health standards that are "at least as effective as" comparable federal standards. (Most States adopt standards identical to federal ones.) States have the option to promulgate standards covering hazards not addressed by federal standards.

North Carolina has a limited number of state-specific standards. A list of these standards is provided below with a Web link for additional details. NCDOL state-specific standards for General Industry include:

  • Hazardous Materials: 13 NCAC 07F.0103, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response
  • Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and Distribution: 13 NCAC 07F. 0105, Fall Protection

NCDOL state-specific standards for Construction Industry include:

  • General Safety and Health Provisions: 13 NCAC 07F. 0202, PPE
  • Occupational Health and Environmental Controls: 13 NCAC 07F. 0203, Non-ionizing Radiation
  • Personal Protective and Life Saving Equipment: 13 NCAC 07F .0204, Snaphooks
  • Steel Erection: 13 NCAC 07F. 0205, Fall Protection
  • Power Transmission and Distribution: 13 NCAC 07F. 0206, PPE
  • Toxic and Hazardous Substances: 13 NCAC 07F. 0207, Bloodborne Pathogens

Additional NCDOL state-specific standards:

  • Communication Towers: 13 NCAC 07F .0600
  • Blasting and Use of Explosives: 13 NCAC 07F .0700
  • Agriculture: 13 NCAC 07F. 0302 (Scope is not affected by number of employees)
  • Maritime: 13 NCAC 07F .0500 (Public Sector coverage only)
  • Access to Medical Records 13 NCAC 7A .0900

NCDOL state specific rules are contained in Title 13 of the North Carolina Administrative Code. The following link to Standards Information and Activity, provides additional information about the status of specific standards in the state.

Enforcement Programs
  • Agricultural Safety and Health Bureau (ASH) - The bureau conducts preoccupancy inspections for migrant labor camps and OSH inspections to ensure compliance with applicable safety and health standards.
  • Compliance Bureau - East and West Compliance conduct random inspections of North Carolina businesses to ensure compliance with applicable workplace safety and health standards. The bureau manages the OSH Complaint Desk that processes work-related safety and health concerns.
  • Planning, Statistics and Information Management (PSIM) - The bureau provides statistical data about North Carolina employers. The bureau produces several annual statistical documents, manages inspection case file disclosures, and administers the inspection assignment process.
Voluntary and Cooperative Programs
  • Consultative Services Bureau - The bureau provides free, on-site consultation upon employer request to help employers comply with workplace safety and health standards. The bureau also administers the Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP) that recognizes small to mid-size businesses that establish and maintain effective safety programs.
  • Education, Training and Technical Assistance (ETTA) - The bureau coordinates and conducts various outreach programs such as safety and health schools and workshops speaking engagements, training events and booth displays. The bureau also reviews the federal standards for state adoption, coordinates state-specific rulemaking activities, distributes OSH publications, and provides written, electronic or telephone interpretive guidance to employers and employees. The bureau also processes variance requests.The bureau also administers two recognition programs, the Carolina Star Program and the Safety Awards Program, that acknowledges businesses with exemplary safety and health programs.
Policies and Procedures

A link to, and explanation of, North Carolina's Operating Procedures can be found on their web site.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

The North Carolina Safety and Health Review Commission is an independent administrative adjudicatory body created by North Carolina General Statute § 95-135 to hear contestments of citations, penalties, and abatement periods issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Division of the North Carolina Department of Labor. The review by the Commission is a two tiered process with an evidentiary hearing held by Administrative Law Judges throughout the state. Decisions of the Administrative Law Judges may then be appealed to the three-member Commission which is appointed by the Governor. The Commission's decision may be appealed first to the Superior Court and then to the North Carolina Court of Appeals and finally to the North Carolina Supreme Court.

Other Resources
NORTH CAROLINA DEPT OF LABOR

Safety  Training

Equipment

Consultants

Occupational Safety and Health Division
111 Hillsborough Street
UpIconRaleigh, NC 27601-1092
 
Mailing Address:
 
NORTH CAROLINA DEPT OF LABOR
Occupational Safety and Health Division
1101 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27699-1101
(919) 807-2900
For detailed contact information visit North Carolina's website.
 

Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division
Department of Consumer & Business ServicesOregon Flag

  • Salem Central Office
  • P.O. Box 14480
  • 350 Winter St. NE, Rm. 430
  • Salem, OR 97309-0405
  •  (503) 378-3272 | (800) 922-2689
  •  (503) 947-7461

 

  • Michael Wood, Administrator

Resource Center:
  •  (503) 947-7453 | (800) 922-2689
Consultation:
  •  (503) 378-3272 | (800) 922-2689

Field Office locations and telephone numbers available on the Oregon State Plan Website.


About the Oregon State Plan [Oregon State Plan Website]

The state of Oregon, under an agreement with OSHA, operates an occupational safety and health program in accordance with Section 18 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The Oregon State Plan was submitted on April 28, 1972, and received certification for completing all developmental steps on September 24, 1982. In May of 2005, after public review and comment, and a comprehensive program evaluation, OSHA granted final approval to the Oregon Program.

The Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division (OR-OSHA) is part of the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services. Oregon OSHA is headquartered in Salem, and has field offices in Portland, Salem, Eugene, Medford, Pendleton and Bend.

Jurisdiction

The state of Oregon exercises safety and health jurisdiction over most private sector employers in the state, and over public sector employers other than the federal government.

Federal OSHA exercises jurisdiction over those employers not covered by the state of Oregon, to include: maritime employers such as shipyards, marine construction, marine terminals, longshoring, and diving; private contractors on military reservations and at Crater Lake National Park; the United States Postal Service; civilian employees of federal installations, and Indian Reservations. See 29 CFR 1952.105.

Regulations and Standards

Over the years, Oregon has adopted a number of major safety and health standards that, while deemed as effective as comparable federal standards, also have significant differences. Oregon has also adopted a number of state-initiated rules for which there are no federal counterparts, including Forest Activity Standards, Agriculture Standards, Firefighter Standards, and Pesticide Worker Protection Standards.

Oregon OSHA's rules are separated into divisions. Division 1 applies to all Oregon employers and contains general rules for the administration of the Oregon Safe Employment Act. Division 2 contains general industry rules; Division 3 contains construction industry rules; Division 4 contains rules relating to agricultural operations; Division 5 contains rules relating to maritime/shipyard operations, and Division 7 contains rules relating to forest activities, including logging.

The Oregon Safe Employment Act, rules in the various divisions, letters of interpretation, recent rule activity, and sign-up for email notification of rule updates can be accessed on the Oregon website in the Rules and Compliance section.

Enforcement Programs

Oregon OSHA enforcement information is available at (503) 378-3272 and (800) 922-2689.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

Oregon OSHA operates successful VPP and SHARP programs. Oregon OSHA also offers safety and health assistance to Oregon employers through a voluntary on-site Consultation Program.

Policies and Procedures

Oregon OSHA Program Directives

Informal Conferences and Appeals

Appeals specialists review appealed citations and conduct informal conferences in an effort to resolve contested cases. Appealed cases not resolved by informal conferences are referred to the Workers' Compensation Board Hearings Division. Administrative Law Judges (ALJs) in the Hearings Division conduct contested case hearings for Oregon OSHA citations and orders. Orders of the Workers' Compensation Board may be appealed to the Oregon Court of Appeals.

Workers' Compensation Board
2601 25th St SE, Ste 150
Salem, OR 97302-1280
(503) 378-3308 | (877) 311-8061 - Salem
(866) 880-2078 - Portland
Other Resources

Safety  Training

Equipment

Consultants

Oregon OSHA offers a wide variety of compliance assistance UpIconmaterials and services via its public internet site. Examples include:
 

Puerto Rico Flag

 Puerto Rico Department of Labor

  • Vance Thomas Rider, Secretary of Labor

 

  • Prudencio Rivera Martinez Building, 21st Floor
  • 505 Muñoz Rivera Avenue
  • Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 00918 
  •  (787) 754-2119
  •  (787) 753-9550

Puerto Rico Occupational Safety and Health Administration (PR OSHA)
  • Jose Israel Droz Alvarado, Assistant Secretary of Labor 
  • Prudencio Rivera Martinez Building, 20th Floor
  • 505 Muñoz Rivera Avenue
  • Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 00918
  •  (787) 754-2172
  •  (787) 767-6051

 

  • Mailing Address:
  • PO Box 195540
  • San Juan, PR 00919-5540

PR OSHA Standards/Normas: (in english y en español)
http://www.osha.gov/fso/osp/PRstandards.html 


About the Puerto Rico State Plan [Puerto Rico State Plan Website]

The Puerto Rico Occupational Safety and Health Administration (PR OSHA), initiated operations in 1978, after the enactment of Act No. 16 of August 5, 1975, the Occupational Safety and Health Act of Puerto Rico, as amended by Act No. 116 of June 24, 1977; Act No. 32 of July 26, 1991; and Act No. 281 of December 19, 2002.

It is similar in most respect to the Federal Act. The purpose of the Act is to guarantee safe and healthful working conditions for all employees in Puerto Rico authorizing the Secretary of Labor to prescribe and enforce safety and health standards, rules and regulations developed or adopted; by assisting and encouraging employers and employees in their efforts to guarantee safe and healthful working conditions; by providing for scientific research, information, education and training and the development of statistic in the field of occupational safety and health. In addition, the Puerto Rico Act requires that a Spanish language version of OSHA standards shall be filed with the Department of State no later than two (2) years after the original filing date. All Citation and Notification of Penalty is issued to the employer in both languages, English and Spanish.

Jurisdiction

The Puerto Rico State Plan applies to all public and private sector employers in the State, with the exception of federal agencies, maritime employers such as shipyards, marine terminals, and longshoring; military facilities; and the U.S. Postal Service. See 29 CFR 1952.382.

Regulations and Standards

States must set job safety and health standards that are "at least as effective" as federal OSHA standards. States may promulgate standards that are more stringent than the comparable federal standards or promulgate standards covering hazards not addressed by federal standards.

The PR OSHA Program has adopted identically all Federal OSHA standards and regulations applicable to public and private sector employment, with minor revisions to the Recordkeeping Rule. In addition, PR OSHA has enacted a regulation to address workplace violence situations, specifically implementing procedures for handling incidents of domestic violence in the workplace.

All standards and regulations adopted by PR OSHA, including Recordkeeping Rule and the proposed "Protocol for Handling Domestic Violence in the Workplace" can be obtained by calling (787) 754-2172.

Enforcement Programs

The Bureau of Inspection, with its Central Office in Hato Rey, is responsible for maintaining an effective enforcement program in the Commonwealth. PR OSHA has maintained the Field Operations Manual (FOM) which provides policy and procedural guidance for its enforcement program.

PR OSHA has safety and health specialists in six area offices who conduct inspections at private and public sector workplaces. Following is contact information for each area office:

ARECIBO
57 Emilio Castelar at San Jose de Diego
Arecibo, PR 00612
(787) 878-0715 | 879-4633
(787) 878-1147
Mr. Alberto Torres Moore, Director
Town Coverage: Arecibo, Barceloneta, Camuy, Ciales, Florida, Hatillo, Lares, Manatí, Morovis, Quebradillas, Utuado, Vega Alta, Vega Baja
CAGUAS
Office #107 Central Gubernamental
Acosta Esq. Goyco, Box 1599
Caguas, PR 00726-1599
(787) 746-7970 | 743-5344
(787) 258-1737
Mr. Ramón Bonilla, Director
Town Coverage: Aguas Buenas, Aibonito, Arroyo, Barranquitas, Caguas, Cayey, Cidra, Comerío, Guayama, Gurabo, Humacao, Juncos, Las Piedras, Maunabo, Patillas, San Lorenzo, Yabucoa
CAROLINA
Centro Gubernamental
Fernández Juncos Avenue, Box 7700
Carolina, PR 00936-7700
(787) 768-2800 | 768-2937
(787) 750-4515
Mr. Pedro Carbonera, Director
Town Coverage: Canóvanas, Carolina, Ceiba, Culebra, Fajardo, Loíza, Luquillo, Naguabo, Río Grande, Trujillo Alto, Vieques
MAYAGUEZ
Road 2, 828 Villa Capitán Bldg.
Suite 304
Mayagüez, PR 00680-1537
(787) 832-4593 | 833-2018
(787) 832-5650
Mrs. Daisy Campos, Director
Town Coverage: Aguada, Aguadilla, Añasco, Cabo Rojo, Hormigueros, Isabela, Lajas, Las Marías, Maricao, Mayaguez, Moca, Rincón, Sabana Grande, San Germán, San Sebastián
PONCE
60 Playita Sector
Puerto Viejo
Ponce, PR 00716-8110
(787) 842-9060 | 840-4420
(787) 259-7701
Mr. Manuel Sánchez, Director
Town Coverage: Adjuntas, Coamo, Guánica, Guayanilla, Jayuya, Juana Díaz, Orocovis, Peñuelas, Ponce, Salinas, Santa Isabel, Villalba, Yauco
SAN JUAN
#577 Ponce De León Ave
Real Hermanos Building
Hato Rey, PR 00918
(787) 754-9416 | 754-5803
(787) 764-1427
Mrs. Awilda Collazo, Acting Director

PR OSHA, as part of their Strategic Plan, has implemented Local Emphasis Programs focusing on the following industries:

  • Printing, Publishing and Allied Industries
  • Metal Doors and Windows Industries
  • Warehousing and Storage Industries
  • Public Sector
Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

This Division of Voluntary Programs, located in the Central Office in Hato Rey, has as main purpose to assist the employers in identifying and correcting safety and health hazards in the workplaces and encourage the employers in establishing and maintaining effective safety and health programs for providing safe and healthful places of employment for their employees. Because consultation services are voluntary, an employer must request the service and agree to certain obligations, the principal one being that employer agrees to correct all safety and health hazards found during the consultation visit within an agreed-upon time frame. The principal assistance will be provided at the employer's worksite, but off-site assistance may also be provided by telephone and at our Office. Also, the Division has two major voluntary recognition programs in place:

  • The Safety and Health Achievement and Recognition Program (SHARP) recognizes small business employers that have made or are committed to making improvements in their worksite-specific safety and health programs. This is accomplished by conducting comprehensive hazard surveys (both safety and health) using the Safety and Health Assessment Worksheet (OSHA-33). In addition, employers must correct all identified hazards and maintain injury and illness rates that are below the national averages for those industries. These worksites are exempt from programmed inspections for varying periods, provided they continue to meet SHARP eligibility criteria.
  • The Voluntary Protection Programs (VPP) emphasizes the importance of, encourages the improvement of, and recognizes excellence of occupational safety and health programs provided by the employers with active participation of employees. The three categories are: Guanín, Cemí and Taíno:
    Guanín
    Designed for worksites with comprehensive and successful safety and health programs. This program is open to any industry and to companies with injury incidence and lost workday injury at or below the national average for that type of industry. The participants in the Guanín Program are evaluated onsite every 30 to 60 months, with annual injury rates reviews.
    Cemí
    Designed for worksites with the potential and commitment to achieve Guanín qualifications. This program is open to sites injury rates above the industry's national average. Cemí participants are evaluated onsite annually. Successful completion of the Cemí Program ensures eligibility for the Guanín Program.
    Taíno
    Designed for companies with 100 employees or less, wishing to participate in the Guanín or Cemí Programs, but do not yet meet their qualifications, do not have expertise nor have technical resources available and require special guidance and assistance to reach at least Cemí quality. This program is open to worksites with a written safety and health program that at least cover the three basic elements: Management Leadership, Employee Participation and Safety and Health Trainings. Taíno participants are evaluated onsite annually. Successful completion with the established goals may ensure eligibility for the Guanín or Cemí Programs.

Additionally, the Division performs a series of educational activities in the field of occupational safety and health such as workshops, seminars and conferences. Employers may contact the Division of Voluntary Programs to request free services at (787) 754-2172.

Policies and Procedures

Explanation of Puerto Rico's policies and procedures can be found by contacting the Central Office at (787) 754-2172.

 

Safety  Training

Equipment

Consultants

Informal Conferences and Appeals

The Puerto Rico Act provides employers the right of administrative review of citations, abatement requirements, and UpIconproposed penalties, and employee review of abatement dates, by a hearing examiner appointed by the Puerto Rico Secretary of Labor. The decision by the Secretary may be appealed by the employer or employees to the civil courts. The plan contains a statement of support by the Governor and an opinion by the Secretary of Justice that the Act is consistent with the State's Law and Constitution. Federal procedural regulations will be incorporated into the Commonwealth's regulations and the Federal Compliance Manual will be adopted to fit Puerto Rico's Law.

 

South Carolina Department of Labor, Licensing and RegulationSouth Carolina Flag
Division of Occupational Safety and Health
P.O. Box 11329
Columbia, South Carolina 29211-1329
PH: (803) 896-7665
FAX: (803) 896-7670


South Carolina Department of Labor, Licensing & Regulation

Holly Pisarik, Director

Dorothy "Dottie" Ison, Occupational Safety and Health Administrator
PH: (803) 896-7686


About the South Carolina State Plan
[South Carolina State Plan Website] 
The South Carolina Occupational Safety and Health Plan (SCOSH) has the distinction of being one of the first programs approved by the United States Department of Labor in accordance with the guidelines of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. This was accomplished on November 30, 1972.

The State program is administered by a Director of the South Carolina Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation. The Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation is divided into divisions for Labor, Fire and Life Safety, and Professional and Occupational Licensing.

The SCOSH plan has been considered fully operational since 1974. This status was recognized in 1975, when the Commissioner for the South Carolina Department of Labor and the OSHA Regional Administrator in Atlanta, Georgia, signed an "Operational Status Agreement". This suspended the concurrent jurisdiction exercised by Federal officials in all areas covered by the state Plan. This was closely followed by "Certification" in 1976, when South Carolina completed all developmental steps as outlined in its Plan and as required by the United States Department of Labor.

On December 15, 1987, the South Carolina program received 18(e) determination (final approval). Final approval of the South Carolina State Plan represented a judgment, after extensive evaluation, that the South Carolina Department of Labor was administering its State Plan in an effective manner, and resulted in formal relinquishment of concurrent Federal authority to enforce occupational safety and health standards in areas covered by the State.

Jurisdiction

The South Carolina OSH Program exercises jurisdiction over all private and public sector employers and employees within the State except private sector maritime activities; employment on military bases; and private sector employment at Area D of the Savannah River Site (power generation and transmission facilities operated by South Carolina Electric and Gas) and at the Three Rivers Solid Waste Authority; Federal government employers and employees; and the U.S. Postal Service (USPS), including USPS employees, and contract employees and contractor-operated facilities engaged in USPS mail operations. See 29 CFR 1952.95.

Regulations and Standards

States must set job safety and health standards that are "at least as effective as" comparable federal standards. (Most States adopt standards identical to federal ones.) States have the option to promulgate standards covering hazards not addressed by federal standards.

South Carolina has adopted the Federal OSHA Standards verbatim, with a few exceptions. These standards including the following:

General Industry 

  • Definition and Requirement for a National Recognized Testing Laboratory, 1910.7
  • Spray Finishing using Flammable and Combustible Material, 1910.107
  • Respiratory Protection, 1910.134
  • Powered Industrial Trucks, 1910.178

Construction Industry 

  • General Safety and Health Provisions, 1926.20
  • Excavation, 1926.650

Please see Detailed Differences between S.C. and Federal Standards.

Enforcement Programs

The state occupational safety and health act requires employers to provide their employees with a safe and healthy worksite which is free of hazards which may cause injuries and illnesses to workers.

The
 SC OSHA office conducts inspections of businesses to assure compliance with the law with a staff of 17 safety inspectors and 12 industrial hygienists.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

Consultation Programs

Employers who want help in recognizing and correcting safety and health hazards and in improving their safety and health programs may obtain it from a free consultation service largely funded by OSHA. The service is delivered by state governments using well-trained professional staff.

Consultation is a cooperative approach to solving safety and health problems in the workplace. As a voluntary activity, it is neither automatic nor unexpected. You must request it. The obligation for the employer is a commitment to correct in a timely manner all job safety and health hazards that are found during the consultation visit. The commitment must be made prior to the visit by the consultant.

In addition to helping employers identify and correct specific hazards, consultants provide guidance in establishing or improving an effective safety and health program and offer training and education for the employer, supervisors and employees.

Primarily targeted for smaller businesses in higher hazard industries or with especially hazardous operations, the safety and health consultation program is completely separate from the inspection effort. In addition, no citations are issued or penalties proposed.

The service is confidential, too. The name of the employer, and any information about the workplace, plus any unsafe or unhealthy working conditions the consultant uncovers, will not be reported routinely to the OSHA inspection staff.

South Carolina Consultation Program information.

Training Classes

OSHA Voluntary Programs provide a variety of training programs and presentations designed to reduce or eliminate safety and health hazards in the workplace. Training is available to employers and employees of both the public and private sector upon request and may occur on-site (requiring participation of 12 or more employees) or as a result of participating in one of the Regional Training programs coordinated by the training staff. In Fiscal Year 2005, in excess of 591 training programs were delivered to employees throughout our state resulting in more than 16,276 employees being trained on various OSHA regulations and other safety and health issues.

General industry, health, and construction areas are covered in the training curriculum. Examples of training programs offered include:

  • The OSHA Inspection Process
  • Bloodborne Pathogens
  • Lockout/Tagout (LOTO)
  • Trenching/Excavation
  • Hazard Communication
  • S.C. SMART- Safety Management Accident Reduction Training
  • Fall Protection (Construction)
  • Personal Protective Equipment
  • Violence in the Workplace
  • Scaffolding (Construction)
  • Permit Required Confined Spaces
  • Industrial Trucks (Forklifts)
  • OSHA Recordkeeping

Policies and Procedures

Program Directives are technical interpretations of standards and may be used as a guide. For more information, please contact
 Gwen Thomas.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

As of January 1, 2009, the South Carolina Administrative Law Court hears and makes decisions on contests of citations, penalties, and abatement dates arising from the enforcement of occupational safety and health standards and regulations.

Employers, employees, and employee representatives have the right to contest citation(s), abatement dates and/or proposed penalty(ies) to SCOSH. If the employer, employee, or employee representative fails to contest, within a twenty (20) calendar day period, the citations(s), abatement date(s), and proposed penalty assessment become a final order not subject to review.

Contest procedures are set forth in the Rules of Procedure for the South Carolina Administrative Law Court (ALC), which may be obtained from the ALC website or by contacting the Clerk, SC Administrative Law Court, Edgar A. Brown Building, 1205 Pendleton Street, Suite 224, Columbia, SC 29201.

Other Resources

Employers in South Carolina are required to post two employment notices from the South Carolina Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation in a place or places where employees can see them. These posters are: OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health) and the Labor Law Abstract (Payment of Wages, Child Labor, and Right-to-Work).

Three other state agencies also require employment postings: the Employment Security Commission's "Workers Pay No Part of the Cost for Job Insurance" (UCI 104) and "If You Become Unemployed (UCI 105); the Workers' Compensation Commission's "Workers Comp Works For You"; and the Human Affairs Commission's "Equal Opportunity is the Law".

Safety Training

Equipment

Consultants

Due to budget constraints, LLR is no longer printing these UpIconposters. They can be downloaded from this site.

South Carolina Department of Labor, Licensing & Regulation

Division of Occupational Safety and Health
P.O. Box 11329
Columbia, South Carolina 29211-1329
PH: (803) 896-7665
FAX: (803) 896-7670
For detailed contact information visit
 SCOSH web site.
 

Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce DevelopmentTennessee Flag
220 French Landing Drive
Nashville, Tennessee 37243-1002
PH: (615) 741-2793
FAX:(615) 741-5078


Burns Phillips, Commissioner
PH: (615) 741-2582

Steve Hawkins, TOSHA Administrator
PH: (615) 741-2793


About the Tennessee State Plan Tennessee State Plan Website

The Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, Division of Occupational Safety and Health (TOSHA) plan was approved on July 5, 1973. Based on the 18(e) Evaluation Report for the period of October 1982 through March 1984, and after opportunity for public comment, the Assistant Secretary determined that in operation the State of Tennessee's occupational safety health program is at least as effective as the Federal program in providing safe and healthful employment and places of employment and meets the criteria for final State plan approval in section 18(e) of the Act and implementing regulations at 29 CFR Part 1902. Accordingly, the Tennessee plan was granted final approval and concurrent Federal enforcement authority was relinquished under section 18(e) of the Act effective July 22, 1985.

TOSHA operates six area offices located strategically around the State of Tennessee. These offices include a central office in Nashville and six field offices located in Knoxville, Memphis, Chattanooga, Kingsport, Jackson and Nashville, TN.

Jurisdiction

The Tennessee plan exercises jurisdiction over all private and public sector employers and employees within the State except private sector maritime activities; railroad employment, not otherwise regulated by another Federal agency; employment at Tennessee Valley Authority facilities; military bases; Federal government employers and employees; and the U.S. Postal Service (USPS). See
 29 CFR 1952.225.

Regulations and Standards

States must set job safety and health standards that are "at least as effective as" comparable federal standards. (Most States adopt standards identical to federal ones.) States have the option to promulgate standards covering hazards not addressed by federal standards.

Tennessee has a limited number of state-specific standards (or standards that were adopted with requirements different from those of federal OSHA). A list of these standards is provided below with a Web link for additional details.

Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development Standards for General Industry are the same as the Federal Standards with the following exceptions:

The Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development does not adopt the following federal occupational safety and health standards:

  • 29 CFR 1910.1 Purpose and scope
  • 29 CFR 1910.2 Definitions
  • 29 CFR 1910.3 Petitions for the issuance, amendment, or repeal of a standard
  • 29 CFR 1910.4 Amendments to this part
  • 29 CFR 1910.15 Shipyard employment
  • 29 CFR 1910.16 Longshoring and marine terminals

Note: In lieu of the current federal occupational safety and health standards codified in 29CFR 1910.1000, the Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development adopts the standards limiting exposure to air contaminants as contained in subparagraph (b) of Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development Rule 0800-1-1-.07(2). Any reference to 29 CFR 1910.1000 or any part of that standard will be a reference to Rule 0800-1-1-.07(2) (b).

Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development Standards for Construction are the same as the Federal Standard with the following exceptions:

The Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development does not adopt the following federal occupational safety and health standards:

  • 29 CFR 1926.1 Purpose and scope
  • 29 CFR 1926.2 Variances from safety and health standards
  • 29 CFR 1926.3 Inspections - right of entry
  • 29 CFR 1926.4 Rules of practice for administrative adjudications for enforcement of safety and health standards

Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development Standards for Agriculture are the same as the Federal Standard.

The Tennessee Right-to-Know Law provides additional requirements that substantially add to the Federal Hazard Communication standards contained in 29 CFR 1910.1200 and 29 CFR 1926.59.

The Tennessee standard for Bloodborne Pathogen also provides additional requirements that are not contained in the Federal Bloodborne Pathogen standard 29 CFR 1910.1030.

Please see
 TOSHA rules for specific requirements.

Safety and Health Enforcement Programs

The safety compliance section of the Division of Occupational Safety and Health (TOSHA) is responsible for enforcement of the Tennessee Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1972 (Title 5, Chapter 3) with emphasis on employee exposures to physical hazards. Physical hazards include but are not limited to construction, machine hazards, walking and working surfaces, flammable and combustible liquids, trenching, motorized equipment, electrical, explosives, fire protection, compressed gases, welding and means of egress.

The state's Health Compliance Officers have been trained as industrial hygienists to evaluate workplaces for chemical, physical and biological hazards. They are involved with monitoring and analyzing occupational health conditions in the workplace to detect the extent of exposure and the engineering and other methods (work practices and personal protective equipment) needed to control these hazards.

Employers are required to report all workplace fatalities or catastrophes (three or more employees hospitalized from one incident) within 8 hours of occurrence. The toll free number is 1-800-249-8510.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs 

Consultative Services is a program offered to employers, especially smaller employers, to assist them in achieving a safe and healthful workplace for their employees. Consultative Services offers both occupational safety and industrial hygiene services to manufacturing, construction, and other types of businesses in Tennessee. This no-cost service is designed to assist employers in developing or enhancing safety and health management systems. The industrial hygienist and occupational safety specialist will identify safety and health hazards and help you implement cost-effective hazard control solutions. For more information, visit the Consultative Services web site.

Policies and Procedures

Additional information on
 Tennessee's Program Directives can be found on the TOSHA web site.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

The Tennessee
 OSH Review Commission is a quasi-judicial body empowered to hear and rule on appeals regarding citations issued by the State Program. The OSH Review Commission may affirm, modify or revoke a citation, as well as any monetary penalty. The Commission consists of three members appointed by the governor, to serve on the body for three-year terms. Rules of the OSH Review Commission are available on the web site.

Safety  Training

Equipment

Consultants

Other Resources

UpIconPublications and Posters

Tennessee Department of Labor

Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development

220 French Landing Drive
Nashville, Tennessee 37243

PH: (615) 741-2582
FAX: (615) 741-5078

For detailed contact information visit the 
TOSHA web site.
 
Utah Labor CommissionUtah Flag

160 East 300 South
P.O. Box 146600
Salt Lake City, Utah 84114-6600
PH: (801) 530-6800
Fax: (801) 530-6044

Sherrie Hayashi, Commissioner
PH: (801) 530-6800


Utah Occupational Safety and Health Division (UOSH) 

Scott McKenzie, Director, UOSH
PH: (801) 530-6901
Fax: (801) 530-7606

Kate McNeill, Consultation Program Manager
PH: (801) 530-6855
Fax: (801) 530-6992

Holly Lawrence, Safety and Health Compliance
Supervisor, Acting Compliance Manager
PH: (801) 530-6494
Fax: (801) 530-7606

Daniel King, Safety and Health Compliance
Supervisor, Acting Compliance Manager
PH: (801) 530-6903
Fax: (801) 530-7606


About the Utah State Plan [Utah State Plan Website] 

The State of Utah, under agreement with OSHA, operates an occupational safety and health program in accordance with Section 18 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The Utah state plan was initially approved on January 10, 1973 and was granted final state plan approval on July 16, 1985.

The Utah Occupational Safety and Health Division is part of Utah’s Labor Commission. There is one UOSH office that covers the entire state, centrally located in Salt Lake City.

Jurisdiction

The Utah State Plan applies to all public and private sector places of employment in the State, with the exception of Federal employees, the United States Postal Service (USPS), private sector maritime, Hill Air Force Base, Tooele Army Depot which includes the Tooele Chemical Demilitarization Facility, and certain agricultural related operations (field sanitation and temporary labor camps), which are subject to Federal OSHA jurisdiction.
 See 29 CFR 1952.115.

Regulations and Standards

State plans must maintain job safety and heath standards that are "at least as effective as" comparable federal standards. States may promulgate standards that are more stringent than the comparable federal standards or promulgate standards covering hazards not addressed by federal standards.

While Utah adopts most Federal standards identically, the state periodically supplements Federal standards with additional requirements. These supplements are placed in the
 Utah Administrative Code R614 and can be found at the Utah State Plan Website. Supplements to federal standards found in the Administrative Code include the following:

  • R614-1-4
    • Section C - Recordkeeping
    • Section D - Employer/Employee Responsibility
    • Section E - General Safety Requirements
  • R614-1-5 Personal Protective Equipment
  • R614-4 Hazardous Materials

Utah has several unique vertical state standards for the following industries which are also located in R614.

General Industry:

R614-2  Drilling Industry
R614-5  Materials Handling and Storage
R614-6-1  Crushing, Screening, and Grinding Equipment
R614,-6-2  Window Cleaning
R614-6-3 House and building Moving
R614-6-4 Industrial Railroads
R614-6-5 Livestock Butchering and Bulk Carcass Handling
R614-6-6 Motor Vehicle Transportation of Workers
R614-6-7 Hot Metallurgical Operations
R614-6-8 Elevators, Escalators, Aerial Trams, Man-lifts, Worker Hoists
R614-6-9 Filters and Centrifuges
R614-6-10 Food Processing
R614-6-11 Boilers and Pressure Vessels

Construction:

R614-7-1 Roofing, Tar-Asphalt
R614-7-2 Grizzlies Over Chutes, Bins and Tank Openings
R614-7-3  Cranes and Derricks
R614-7-4 Residential-Type construction, Raising Framed Walls 

Since Utah has opted to have no jurisdiction in maritime industries, the state has not adopted 29 CFR 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918 or a state equivalent.

Enforcement Programs

Utah compliance is responsible for the enforcement of the OSHA and UOSH safety and health standards. Compliance officers inspect workplaces for hazardous conditions and issue citations where violations of OSHA and UOSH regulations are found. Inspections may be the result of: regular scheduling, imminent danger reports, fatalities, accidents, employee complaints or referrals. Inspections in Utah are scheduled using Industrial Accidents data and emphasis programs. More information on enforcement in Utah can be found on the Utah State Plan web site in the UOSH Compliance section. Information can also be obtained by calling (801) 530-6901.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

Utah offers several voluntary and cooperative programs focused on reducing injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. Utah employers are invited to take advantage of the on-site consultation program, the Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP) and the Voluntary Protection Program (VVP). More detailed information on these programs can be found on the
 Compliance Assistance webpage.

The Utah
 Private Sector Consultation Program provides workplace safety and health assistance to small employers. These consultation services are offered without citations or penalties, at no cost to private sector employers with 250 Utah employees or less. The services are confidential and offered only at the employer’s request. The state also provides the same services to public sector entities through the Public Sector Consultation Program. For more information about these and other services available, please contact the Consultation Manager at (801) 530-6855.

Policies and Procedures

UOSH provides guidance for its enforcement programs through "The Utah Field Operations Manual" (FOM) and the "Policy and Procedures Manual". For more information contact the UOSH Operations Manager at (801) 530-6901.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

Informal conferences are conducted in the UOSH office in an effort to settle cases proactively. Employers in Utah have thirty days to submit a written notification to the Adjudication Division of their intent to contest citations and/or penalties. Cases are assigned to an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ). Appealed decisions of the ALJ automatically move forward to the Commissioner unless the appeal is requested to be heard before the Labor Commission Appeals Board. The Labor Commission Appeals Board is composed of three members: one employer, one employee and one undefined member. Each board member is selected by the Governor and serves a six year term. No more than two members can be of the same political

Safety Training

Equipment

Consultants

affiliation. Decisions by the Board are majority decisions. Appealed decisions of either the Board or the Commissioner UpIconare heard in the Utah Court of Appeals.

Adjudication Division
P O Box 146615
Salt Lake City UT 84114-6615
PH: (801) 530-6800

Other Resources

Utah compliance assistant specialists (CAS) provide a wide variety of outreach programs in English and Spanish as well as newsletters, which are also posted on the UOSH web site.

   

Vermont Department of Labor and IndustryVermont Flag
5 Green Mountain Drive
P O Box 488
Montpelier, VT 05601-0488
PH: (802) 828-4000
FAX: (802) 888-4022

Annie Noonan, Commissioner
PH: (802) 828-4000



Vermont Occupational Safety and Health Administration (VOSHA)

Daniel Whipple, VOSHA Program Manager
PH: (802) 828-5084
Fax: (802) 828-0408

H. Leslie Burns, Occupational Safety Compliance Supervisor
PH: (802) 828-5084



About the Vermont State Plan [Vermont State Plan Website]

The State of Vermont, under an agreement with OSHA, operates an occupational safety and health program in accordance with Section 18 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The Vermont State Plan was initially approved October 16, 1973, and was certified as being structurally completed on March 4, 1977.

The Vermont Occupational Safety and Health Program (VOSHA) is a part of the Vermont Department of Labor, Workers' Compensation and Safety Division. The head of the Department is the Commissioner of Labor.

Jurisdiction

The State of Vermont has jurisdiction over all public and private sector places of employment in the state, with the exception of federal employees, the United States Postal Service, private sector maritime activities (shipyard employment, marine terminals, and longshoring),and military bases, which are subject to federal jurisdiction.
 See 29 CFR 1952.272.

Regulations and Standards

VOSHA has adopted most federal OSHA standards by reference. There are two state-specific standards in effect at this time:

  • 1910.1000 Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs)
  • Mandatory appendix to the Power Transmission, Generation and Distribution Standard 1910.269 Lineworker Safety).

The Vermont-specific standards and the Vermont Labor Statutes can be found here. Additionally, a VOSHA online complaint form and a VOSHA e-mail list signup can be found at the same site.

Vermont has adopted the federal recordkeeping and reporting requirements. Links to Vermont's Occupational Safety and Health Standards and recordkeeping requirements are available on the
 VOSHA home page.

Enforcement Programs

VOSHA has adopted the federal
 Field Inspection Reference Manual (FIRM) to provide policy guidance for its enforcement program. Information on unique enforcement initiatives or local emphasis programs can be obtained by calling 1-800-287-2765 in Vermont or 802-828-2765.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

VOSHA offers a number of voluntary and cooperative programs focused on reducing injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. VOSHA also offers safety and health assistance to Vermont employers through a voluntary on-site consultation program entitled Project WorkSAFE. The State operates successful VPP and SHARP programs. More information on these programs is available at these links:

Policies and Procedures

VOSHA has adopted federal CPL (Compliance) and STD (Standards) directives where applicable. Because VOSHA asserts no jurisdiction in maritime, no directives have been adopted for Parts 1917, 1918 and 1919.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

VOSHA management staff conduct informal conferences in an effort to resolve appealed cases. Cases not resolved by informal conferences are placed in contest and referred to the VOSHA Review Board. The Board hires hearing officers to conduct contested case hearings for VOSHA citations and orders.

Orders of the VOSHA Review Board may be appealed to Vermont Superior Court. Information on the VOSHA Review Board can be obtained by calling 802-828-2775.

The VOSHA Review Board statutory language can be found
 here.

The VOSHA Review Board Rules of Procedure are available by calling:
802-828-2775 or 802-828-2765

Deborah Doyle, Clerk
VOSHA Review Board
13 Baldwin St.
Montpelier VT
802-828-2775

Mailing address:
133 State St.

Safety Training

Equipment

Consultants

Montpelier VT 05633-6701
UpIcon
Other Resources

Project Road-safe is a program funded by a grant from the Federal Highway Safety Administration. This program informs employers of the hazards and Workers' Compensation costs associated with the use of motor vehicles by their workforce. Information on this program, a guidebook to reduce traffic crashes and a Road-safe e-mail signup can be found at
 ProjectRoad-safe section of the Vermont Department of Labor website.


Virgin Islands Department of LaborVirgin Islands Flag

Albert Bryan, Jr., Commissioner
Ph: (340) 773-1994


Division of Occupational Safety and Health (VIDOSH)

3012 Golden Rock
Christiansted, St. Croix VI 00890
Ph: (340) 772-1315
Fax: (340) 772-4323

Dean R. Andrews, Director
Ph: (340) 773-1994 X-2161
Fax: (340) 773-0094


About the Virgin Islands State Plan [Virgin Islands State Plan Website]

The Virgin Islands State Plan was converted to a public employee only occupational safety and health program on July 1, 2003. It is administered and enforced by the Virgin Islands Department of Labor, Division of Occupational Safety and Health (VIDOSH) throughout the U.S. Virgin Islands. The Virgin Islands public employee program, established by the Virgin Islands Occupational Safety and Health Act (24 V.I.C. Chapter 2 - Act No. 6846) was amended on July 19, 2006 to reflect its limited public sector coverage in compliance with the revisions noted above. It extends full authority to the agency to enforce and administer all laws and rules protecting the safety and health of employees of the Government of the Virgin Islands, its departments, agencies and instrumentalities, including any political s

ubdivisions. It covers all activities of public employers and employees and places of public employment. The Territory has adopted all Federal standards applicable to the public sector in the Territory of the U.S. Virgin Islands, and has given assurances that it will continue to adopt and update all Federal standards, revisions and amendments.

Jurisdiction

The Virgin Island State Plan applies to all territorial government agencies throughout the Virgin Islands, including Public Authorities, Fire Departments and School Districts.

Federal OSHA maintains jurisdiction over all private sector workplaces as well as federal agencies, maritime employers such as shipyards, marine terminals, and longshoring; military facilities; and the U.S. Postal Service.

Regulations and Standards

States must set job safety and health standards that are "at least as effective" as Federal OSHA standards. States may promulgate standards that are more stringent than the comparable federal standards or promulgate standards covering hazards not addressed by federal standards.

The VIDOSH Program has adopted identically all Federal OSHA standards and regulations applicable to public sector employment.

Enforcement Programs

VIDOSH has maintained the Field Operations Manual (FOM) with modifications specific for public sector enforcement, which can be obtained by calling (340) 772-1315.

The program is administered by Department of Labor with two offices located at the following locations:

St. Croix - Main Office:
3012 Golden Rock, VITRACO Mall
Christiansted, St. Croix, VI
(340) 772-1315

St. Thomas Office:
St. Thomas, VI
53A & 54B Kronprindense Gade
(340) 776-3700 x2617


Information on unique enforcement initiatives or local emphasis program can be obtained by calling the main office number listed above or accessing the Virgin Islands State Plan Website contact information.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

VIDOSH offers public employers the opportunity to seek voluntary and free consultation and training services for the purpose of reducing injuries, illnesses and fatalities in the public sector, including workplace hazard assessment surveys, training and outreach seminars. All consultation services are conducted separate and apart from enforcement activities. Public employers should contact the Director for VIDOSH at (340) 772-1315 to request and schedule an onsite consultation visit and/or training needs.

The Government of the U.S. Virgin Islands also has an agreement with OSHA, under Section 21(d) of the OSH Act to provide free onsite consultation services to the private sector. For more information on this service, please contact the "Safety in Paradise" Onsite Consultation Program, administered by the University of the Virgin Islands,
 Community Engagement and Lifelong Learning (UVI-CELL) Center at (340) 693-1100.

Policies and Procedures

All policies and procedures enforced by VIDOSH are identical to those for Federal OSHA, except that their coverage is limited to public sector workplaces only. For additional information, please call the Director for VIDOSH at (340) 772-1315 or log on to the
 Virgin Islands State Plan Website.

You may also log on to
 OSHA's website

Informal Conferences and Appeals

The VIDOSH Act provides that, if a public sector employer notifies the Commissioner of Labor that he/she intends to contest a citation within fifteen working days of its issuance, or any employee or representative of employees files a notice of contest with respect to the abatement period, the Commissioner shall immediately advise a hearing examiner of such notification, and the hearing examiner shall afford an opportunity for a hearing. The hearing examiner shall thereafter issue an order, based on findings of fact and conclusions of law affirming, modifying or vacating the Commissioner's citation or proposed penalty, or directing other appropriate relief, and such order shall become final twenty days after its issuance.

Furthermore, any person adversely affected or aggrieved by a final order of the hearing examiner, or a final order of the Commissioner, may obtain a review of such order in the Superior Court of the Virgin Islands by filing in such court within thirty days following the issuance of such order a written petition praying that the order be modified or set aside. Upon such filing the court shall have jurisdiction of the proceeding and of the question determined herein, and may grant such temporary relief or restraining order as it considers just and proper, and to make and enter upon the pleadings, testimony, and proceeding set forth in such record a decree affirming, modifying, or setting aside in whole or in part, the order of the Commissioner and enforcing the order to the extent that the order is affirmed or modified.

All proceedings shall be heard summarily and given preference over all other civil proceedings. The Commissioner may petition for enforcement of his final order by filing a petition for such relief in the Superior Court of the Virgin Islands and the provisions of subsections (a) and (b) of the Act shall govern such proceedings to the extent applicable.

At any time prior to the commencement of the hearing before the Hearing Examiner, any person entitled to appear as a party may file a statement of position. At any state of a proceeding, a party may withdraw his notice of contest, subject to the approval of the Hearting Examiner. At any time before the hearing, the Hearing Examiner may issue a rehearing order which includes the agreement reached by the parties. It shall be the duty of the Hearing Examiner to conduct a fair and impartial hearing. In all proceedings commenced by the filing of a notice of contest, the burden of proof shall rest with the Commissioner.

More information on VIDOSH's review procedures can be found in the VIDOSH Act 

Safety  Training

Equipment

Consultants

and at the Department of Labor's Hearing and Appeals UpIconDivision.

Other Resources

VIDOSH's Publications and Posters and other Compliance Assistance documents can be obtained by calling (340) 772-1315. You can also find OSHA publications at
 OSHA's website.
 

Virginia Department of Labor and IndustryVirginia Flag

  • Main Street Centre
  • 600 East Main Street
  • Richmond, VA 23219
  • (804) 371-2327

 

  • William Burge, Assistant Commissioner
  • (804) 786-2327
  • (804) 371-6524

 

  • Jay Withrow, Director, Office of Legal Support
  • (804) 371-2327
  • (804) 371-6524 


About the Virginia State Plan [Virginia State Plan Website]

The Virginia Department of Labor and Industry (DOLI) administers a State Plan Program consistent with the provisions of Section 18(e) of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act ("the Act"). Section 40.1-1 of the Code of Virginia, as amended, provides that the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry is responsible in the Commonwealth for administering and enforcing occupational safety and health activities as required by the Act. The Commissioner of Labor and Industry is appointed by the Governor and is authorized by §40.1-2.1 of the Code of Virginia to enter into such agreements with Federal OSHA as are necessary to assist in the enforcement of the Act. In addition, §40.1-51 of the Code of Virginia, as amended, provides that the State Health Commissioner shall be responsible, upon request, for advising and providing technical aid to the Commissioner on matters pertaining to occupational health.

The Virginia Safety and Health Codes Board ("the Board") is responsible for the promulgation of all occupational safety and health standards for enforcement by the Department of Labor and Industry. The Board has adopted and will continue to adopt procedures, operations and criteria consistent with the Act, including those which have been established by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and does so for the benefit of the Commonwealth. The Board is a regulatory board appointed by the Governor and has the authority in the Commonwealth under §40.1-22 of the Code of Virginia, to adopt, amend or repeal standards, as necessary, pertaining to safety and health issues, including conditions for which no federal standards have been established.

The Virginia Department of Labor and Industry, headquartered in Richmond, consists of separate program groups with representatives stationed in different regional and field offices located in Abingdon, Lynchburg, Manassas, Norfolk, Richmond, Roanoke, Verona, and Winchester. Each group has been delegated certain powers by the Commissioner to carry out the specific statutory mandates of the Department.

The Virginia State Plan was initially approved on September 28, 1976. The Department of Labor and Industry was awarded a Certificate of Final State Plan Approval for the VOSH Program by federal OSHA on November 30, 1988.

Jurisdiction

The Virginia State Plan applies to all public and private sector places of employment in the state, with the exception of federal employees, the United States Postal Service, private sector maritime, federal military facilities, and other federal enclaves where the state has ceded jurisdiction to the federal government. See 29 CFR 1952.375.

Regulations and Standards

The Virginia Occupational Safety and Health (VOSH) Program, as all other State Plans, must set job safety and health standards that are "at least as effective as" comparable federal standards. Most State Plans adopt standards identical to federal OSHA. States also have the option to promulgate additional standards covering other hazards or conditions not addressed by federal standards.

The vast majority of the VOSH standards are identical to federal OSHA standards. All standards adopted by the Board from 29 CFR Parts 1910, 1926, and 1928 shall apply by their own terms to all employers who have employees working at places of employment within the jurisdiction of the State Plan of the Commonwealth. Standards from Part 1910 apply to employers engaged in general industry; in addition, certain standards from Part 1910 determined by federal OSHA and the Board to be applicable to the construction industry also apply to the construction industry in Virginia. Standards adopted from 29 CFR Part 1926 apply to the construction industry, and standards adopted from 29 CFR Part 1928 apply to agricultural operations within the jurisdiction of the Commonwealth. In addition, standards from 29 CFR Part 1915, Shipyard Employment; 29 CFR Part 1917, Marine Terminals; and 29 CFR Part 1918, Longshoring, have been adopted for state plan use in the public sector only.

Any new or unique standard adopted Virginia for which no federal OSHA counterpart exists shall apply as specified by the terms of that standard. The VOSH Administrative Regulations, 16 VAC 25-60, et seq., set forth rules defining the applicability of occupational safety and health standards in Virginia. There are several standards that are unique to Virginia. In these instances, federal OSHA either does not have a comparable standard addressing the specific hazard or condition or, if it does, the federal standard differs substantially.

The VOSH Program also assures compliance with the Virginia Overhead High Voltage Line Safety Act that was enacted by the General Assembly in 1989 and codified at §§ 59.1-406 to 414 of the Code of Virginia. This statute is designed to "promote the safety and protection of persons engaged in work or activity in the vicinity of overhead high voltage lines." This statutory standard is directly enforced in the same manner as VOSH regulatory standards.

Also related to the VOSH program are:

The Department's Asbestos Notification and Permit Program was established by the General Assembly in 1992 and codified at §§40.1-51.20 to 51.22 of the Code of Virginia, as part of a larger multi-agency state program, requiring licensing and certification of asbestos contractors and workers by the Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation (DPOR). Identical provisions were added for lead contractors in 1996.

In 1993, the Department entered into an enforcement agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). DOLI was authorized by EPA to provide direct enforcement in Virginia of certain parts of 40 CFR Subpart M, dealing with asbestos under the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) regulations of the federal Clean Air Act. Specifically, DOLI is responsible for demolition and renovation activities, spraying, insulating materials, waste disposal for such operations, and active waste disposal sites. The Board is authorized to formulate definitions, rules, regulations, and standards which shall be designed to ensure the proper demolition and renovation of asbestos facilities and effect compliance with the asbestos NESHAP requirements for federal EPA. Such standards must be at least as stringent as the asbestos regulations passed pursuant to §112 of the Clean Air Act.

For more information concerning Occupational Safety or Health Compliance, please see the Contact Information in the sidebar.

Enforcement Programs

The VOSH Program conducts inspections of private and public sector employers under its jurisdiction to assure compliance with the occupational safety and health laws, standards and regulations of the Commonwealth. Employees have the right to file a safety and health complaint with VOSH and employers must report worksite fatalities and catastrophes. The Enforcement Program may issue citations listing alleged violations of occupational safety and health standards and regulations to employers, determines dates by which violations must be abated, and may propose civil monetary penalties for certain types of violations. Public sector employers are not issued civil monetary penalties.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

The Virginia Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) recognizes and promotes companies/agencies with comprehensive safety and health programs that go beyond VOSH standards to protect workers. Worksites establish a cooperative relationship between management, labor and VOSH; and have safety and health management systems that follow rigorous criteria established by VOSH. Benefits identified by VPP worksites include: improved employee motivation to work safely, leading to better quality and productivity; reduced workers' compensation costs; fewer lost workday injuries; and community recognition.

The Department of Labor and Industry provides On-Site Consultation services to help employers better understand and voluntarily comply with the VOSH standards. This voluntary program helps employers identify and correct potential safety and health hazards. Priority is given to employers with 250 or fewer employees in high hazard workplaces.

The Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP) was developed to provide incentives and support to smaller, high-hazard employers to work with employees to develop, implement, and continuously improve safety and health programs. SHARP recognizes worksites that operate exemplary safety and health programs that result in the immediate and long-term prevention of job related injuries and illnesses.

Policies and Procedures

VOSH operating procedures include the VOSH Administrative Regulations Manual, Closing Conference Guide, and Field Operations Manual.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

Each employer, employee, or employee representative may request an informal conference after receipt of the citation(s) of alleged violations. The informal conference may be requested through the individual VOSH Regional Director at the applicable regional office address.

As detailed in the VOSH Administrative Regulations, an employer who has received a citation or proposed penalty may contest the citation by notifying VOSH in writing of the contest. The employer must mail or deliver by hand the notice of contest within 15 working days from the receipt of the citation or proposed penalty. Employees or their authorized representatives may contest in writing any or all of the abatement dates set for violations if they believe them to be unreasonable. Employees have 15 working days from the date the employer received the citation and notification of penalty to contest. The filing of an employee contest does not suspend an employer's obligation to abate. Once VOSH has received written notification of a contest of citation or proposed penalty, VOSH will attempt to resolve the matter by settlement. If a settlement cannot be reached, VOSH will then initiate judicial proceedings by referring the contested issues to the Commonwealth's Attorney for the locality where the alleged violation occurred and arrange for the filing of a complaint and issuance of a summons to the employer. There is no system of administrative law judges for VOSH violation resolution. A trial will be scheduled before the circuit court in the jurisdiction in which the violation occurred.

The final determination on whether to appeal an adverse judicial decision will be

Safety   Training

Equipment

Consultants

made by the Commissioner after consultation with the Office of

UpIcon

the State Attorney General and/or the applicable Commonwealth's Attorney. Appeals from circuit court may be heard by the Virginia Court of Appeals. The Department has thirty (30) days to file an appeal with the Virginia Court of Appeals.

Other Resources

VOSH Jobs Safety and Health Poster
Other program related information

 

Washington Department of Labor and IndustriesWashington Flag
Division of Occupational Safety & Health (DOSH)

7273 Linderson Way SW
Tumwater, WA 98501-5414

Mailling Address:
P.O. Box 44600
Olympia, WA 98504-4600



Anne Soiza, Assistant Director, DOSH
Dave Puente, Deputy Assistant Director, DOSH

PH: (360) 902-5494
Fax: (360) 902-5619

L&I Information: 1-800-547-8367

Safety and Health Hot Line:
1-800-4BE-SAFE or 1-800-423-7233


About the Washington State Plan [Washington State Plan Website] 

The state of Washington, under an agreement with OSHA, operates an occupational safety and health program in accordance with Section 18 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The Washington State Plan was approved in January, 1973, and the state's enabling legislation, the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act, took effect in June of 1973. The Washington program received certification for completing all developmental steps in January, 1982.

The Washington State Program is administered by the Department of Labor and Industries (DL&I), Division of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH). A director, appointed by the Governor, heads the department and serves as the state plan designee. The Assistant Director for DOSH administers the day-to-day operations of the state program. The central office for DOSH is located in Tumwater, Washington. The Division has various regional and field offices located throughout the state. The DOSH program establishes policy and technical guidance, writes standards, develops internal and external training, monitors and evaluates DOSH programs, conducts inspections, and provides consultative services.

Jurisdiction

The state of Washington exercises safety and health jurisdiction over most private sector employers in the state, and public sector employers except the federal government.

Federal OSHA exercises jurisdiction over employers not covered by the state of Washington, including civilian federal employees and private contractors on military reservations and national parks, floating maritime operations, the United States Postal Service, tribal operations and tribal member employers on Indian Reservations and Trust Lands, and certain contractors within the boundary of the Hanford Reservation or the Hanford Reach National Monument not regulated by DOE or the state of Washington.
 See 29 CFR 1952.122.

Regulations and Standards

Over the years, the state of Washington has adopted a number of safety and health standards which have some significant differences from the federal counterparts. Examples include Washington's rules for fall protection, respiratory protection, aerial lifts, and agriculture. DOSH has also adopted a number of state-initiated rules for which there are no federal counterparts, including requirements for written safety and health programs, and for safety committees.

As part of the DOSH Standards Innovations Project, Washington grouped a number of basic safety and health standards, necessary for most employers, into one code section (Chapter 296-800 WAC). These are referred to as Core Rules. The Core Rules include requirements for Safe Workplace (similar to the OSHA General Duty Clause), Accident Prevention Program, First Aid, PPE, Hazard Communication, Safety Bulletin Board/Poster, Lighting, Housekeeping, Sanitation, Environmental, Tobacco Smoke in the Office, Stairs and Railings, Floor Holes and Openings, Open-sided Floors, Workplace Structural Integrity, Basic Electrical Rules, Portable Fire Extinguishers, and Exit Routes and Employee Alarm Systems.

Please see the
 Washington Regulations section of the Washington State Plan website.

Enforcement Programs

DOSH enforcement information, such as applicable rules and regulations, DOSH Compliance Manual, policies and procedures are found in program directives. You can also file a safety and health complaint or a discrimination complaint electronically via the
 Washington State Plan website. (Note: the DOSH Compliance Manual is not available through the web page. However, questions related to enforcement programs and policies should be directed to DOSH offices or contacts listed.)

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

As part of the DOSH mission to keep Washington workers safe, DOSH conducts free on-site safety and health consultations each year for employers who request help in complying with DOSH rules and in improving their safety and health program in their unique workplace setting. These consultations help prevent injuries, illnesses and death and contribute to the DOSH goal of having the safest workplaces in the nation. For additional details and to request a free consultation or to find out about other voluntary compliance resources, please visit the
 Assistance & Consultation section of the DOSH website.

DOSH also offers and operates a
 Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) for employers who operate an exemplary safety and health program. VPP information, program application, and a list of current VPP sites in Washington are available on the DOSH website.

Additionally, DOSH provides various
 training resources and publications.

Policies and Procedures

DOSH Program Directives (re: procedures and interpretations of regulations)

Informal Conferences and Appeals

DOSH has procedures under Washington's Administrative Rules (Chapter 296-900 WAC) and the DOSH Administrative Manual that afford employers the right to administrative and judicial review of alleged violations, initial penalties and abatement periods. The same procedures also provide employees and their representatives the opportunity to participate in review proceedings and contest citation abatement dates(s). See Chapter 49.17.140 RCW.

First appeals are sent to the Department for consideration and may be sent to: DOSH Appeals, P.O. Box 44604, Olympia, WA 98504-4604, telephone (360) 902-

Safety  Training

Equipment

Consultants

5486 and Fax (360) 902-5581 and office hours 8:00 am – 5:00 pm M-F, excluding legal holidays. The next step in the appeals UpIconprocess is more formal and resides outside the Department in the independent Board of Industrial Insurance Appeals (BIIA), P.O. Box 42401, Olympia, WA 98504-4201, telephone toll free 1-800-442-0447 or call (360) 586-5611, Fax (360) 586-5611 [physical address: 2430 Chandler Court SW, Olympia, WA 98504-4201] and office hours 8:00 am – 5:00 pm MF, excluding legal holidays.

Other Resources

Publications (e.g. Basic Steps to a Safe Workplace) and posters (Chapter 296–800 WAC)

Employers may also contact one of the
 DOSH regional or field offices located in the state. 
 

Wyoming Department of EmploymentWyoming Flag
Herschler Building
122 West 25th St., 2nd Floor East
Cheyenne, WY 82002
PH: (307) 777-8650
Fax: (307) 777-5857

John Ysebaert, Administrator, Office of Standards and Compliance
PH: (307) 777-7672
Fax: (307) 777-5805


Wyoming Workers’ Safety (OSHA)

J.D. Danni, OSHA Program Manager
PH: (307) 777-7786
Fax: (307) 777-3646

Ken Masters, Compliance Supervisor
PH: (307) 777-7705

Dan Bulkley, Consultation Supervisor
PH: (307) 777-7710



About the Wyoming State Plan [Wyoming State Plan Website] 

The State of Wyoming, under agreement with OSHA, operates an occupational safety and health program in accordance with Section 18 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The Wyoming State Plan was initially approved on May 3, 1974, and was granted final state plan approval on June 27, 1985.

Jurisdiction

The Wyoming State Plan applies to all public and private sector places of employment in the State, with the exception of Federal employees (including those employed at Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks), the United States Postal Service (USPS), private sector maritime, employment at Warren Air Force Base and at the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserve in Casper, and certain agricultural related operations (field sanitation and temporary labor camps), which are subject to Federal OSHA jurisdiction.
 See 29 CFR 1952.345.

Regulations and Standards

The Wyoming State Plan adopts all federal standards identically except for 1910 Subpart A, B, and C, and 1926 Subpart A and B, which have been reworded to reflect the Wyoming's Safety Act. New standards are promulgated by the state of Wyoming within six months of promulgation by the Secretary of Labor. Wyoming cannot adopt standards that are more stringent than corresponding federal standards, but can adopt standards for industries not covered by federal OSHA.

Wyoming has adopted the federal recordkeeping and reporting requirements identical to the federal rule, 29 CFR 1904.

For Wyoming's Occupational Safety and Health Standards, access the
 Wyoming Occupational Health and Safety's standards page.

Wyoming has
 unique standards that cover Oil and Gas Well Drilling, Servicing, Special Servicing and Anchor Tester Requirements. Federal OSHA does not have specific standards for this industry.

Since Wyoming does not have jurisdiction in maritime industries, the state has not adopted 29 CFR 1915, 1916, 1917, or 1918 or a state equivalent.

Enforcement Programs

Wyoming compliance is responsible for the enforcement of the OSHA and Wyoming safety and health standards. Compliance officers inspect workplaces for hazardous conditions and issue citations where hazardous conditions are found. Inspections may be the result of regular scheduling, imminent danger reports, fatalities, employee complaints or referrals. Inspections in Wyoming are scheduled for high hazard industries using worker compensation rates or through local emphasis programs or the University of Tennessee Dodge Report system. More information on enforcement in Wyoming can be found on
 Wyoming's Compliance Page or by calling (307) 777-7786.

Voluntary and Cooperative Programs

Wyoming offers free safety and health assistance to Wyoming employers upon request through a voluntary on-site Consultation Program. Consultation Services includes safety and health program assistance, courtesy on-site hazard surveys, and safety and health training on a variety of subjects covering general industry, construction, and the oil and gas industry.

Wyoming operates three successful recognition programs:
 Cowboy Voluntary Protection Program (CVPP) [PDF*- 26 KB], Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP) [PDF*- 69 KB] and Employer's Voluntary Technical Assistance Program (EVTAP) [PDF*- 73 KB]. More detailed information on these programs can be found on Wyoming's Consultation Page.

Policies and Procedures

The Wyoming Rules of Practice and Procedure provide guidance for Enforcement and Consultation Programs. The procedures can be found on-line by accessing the
 Wyoming Occupational Health and Safety Compliance page.

Informal Conferences and Appeals

Informal conferences are conducted in the Wyoming OSHA office in an effort to resolve contested cases. Contested cases not resolved by informal conference are referred to the
 Office of Administrative Hearings (OAH), which is an independent state agency. The OAH hearing officer then recommends a decision to the Occupational Safety and Health Commission which is composed of seven Commissioners appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate for six year terms. The Commission is composed of one management representative, one labor representative, one medical doctor and four at-large members. The Commission

Safety  Training

Equipment

Consultants

UpIconmakes the final decision concerning contested cases. If appealed by either party, the contested case will move to the District Court and onto the State Supreme Court if not resolved.

Office of Administrative Hearings
Wyoming Financial Center
2020 Carey Avenue, 9th Floor
Cheyenne, WY 82002

Other Resources

Wyoming offers a wide variety of training classes to their constituents. A list of those courses and a schedule of upcoming training can be found on the Wyoming website under Safety Training Resources.